AI News, Two robots are better than one: 5G antenna measurement research

Two robots are better than one: 5G antenna measurement research

NIST's new Large Antenna Positioning System (LAPS) has two robotic arms designed to position 'smart' or adaptable antennas, which can be mounted on base stations that handle signals to and from huge numbers of devices.

Future 5G systems will operate at higher frequencies and offer more than 100 times the data-carrying capacity of today's cellphones, while connecting billions of mobile broadband users in complex, crowded signal environments.

Today's mobile devices such as cell phones, consumer Wi-Fi systems and public safety radios mostly operate at frequencies below 3 gigahertz (GHz), a crowded part of the spectrum.

Next-generation mobile communications are starting to use the more open frequency bands at millimeter wavelengths (30-300 GHz), but these signals are easily distorted and more likely to be affected by physical barriers such as walls or buildings.

NIST developed the LAPS concept of a dual robotic arm system, one robot in a fixed position and the other mounted on a large linear rail slide to accommodate larger antennas and base stations.

The near-field technique measures the radiated signal very close to the antenna in a controlled environment and, using mathematical algorithms developed at NIST, calculates the antenna's performance at its operating distance, known as the far field.

Two Robots Are Better than One for NIST’s 5G Antenna Measurement Research

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) continue to pioneer new antenna measurement methods, this time for future 5G wireless communications systems.

Future 5G systems will operate at higher frequencies and offer more than 100 times the data-carrying capacity of today’s cellphones, while connecting billions of mobile broadband users in complex, crowded signal environments.

Today’s mobile devices such as cell phones, consumer Wi-Fi systems and public safety radios mostly operate at frequencies below 3 gigahertz (GHz), a crowded part of the spectrum.

Next-generation mobile communications are starting to use the more open frequency bands at millimeter wavelengths (30–300 GHz), but these signals are easily distorted and more likely to be affected by physical barriers such as walls or buildings.

NIST developed the LAPS concept of a dual robotic arm system, one robot in a fixed position and the other mounted on a large linear rail slide to accommodate larger antennas and base stations.

The near-field technique measures the radiated signal very close to the antenna in a controlled environment and, using mathematical algorithms developed at NIST, calculates the antenna’s performance at its operating distance, known as the far field.

Two Robot Arms Advance 5G Antenna Measurement

To prepare for 5G wireless communication systems, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers are pushing the boundaries of antenna measurement techniques.

According to NIST, “Future 5G systems will operate at higher frequencies and offer more than 100 times the data-carrying capacity of today's cellphones, while connecting billions of mobile broadband users in complex, crowded signal environments.” To prepare for 5G tech, two robotic arms helm NIST’s new Large Antenna Positioning System (LAPS).

Initial validation shows that basic mechanical operation of the LAPS is within the specified design tolerances for still and moving tests to at least 30 GHz.” Currently, the research team is still validating LAPS’ performance with ongoing experiments.

Test and Measurement: NIST doubles up on robotic arms to test 5G antennas

But that system can only measure physically small antennas, according to the agency. LAPS, NIST said, uses one arm in a fixed position and the other mounted on a rail slide (see photo) so that larger antennas and base stations can be tested.

KickStart 2.0’s major upgrades include the ability to control multiple instruments, with support for up to eight apps simultaneously and visualization of data from multiple instruments in a single view.

and  new threat visibility to activity such as malware, botnets, phishing and intrusion attempts in its SecureStack feature set for its Vision One and Vision 7300 packet brokers, and its CloudLens Private cloud visibility solution.

–GL Communications introduced a new rack space enclosure that holds up to three of its USB-based test hardware units, with up to three additional units that can be connected to the primary units, using the same software and licenses, for scalability.

–Fluke Networks has three new adapters for its Versiv DSX CableAnalyzer series, aimed at simplifying installation of networked devices through the use of a Modular Plug Terminated Link cabling and certifying that cabling, in lieu of the typical four-connector channel.  “With the proliferation of IoT, more devices than ever are communicating and receiving power via the network cabling infrastructure,” said Bob Allan, Siemon’s Global Business Development Manager for Intelligent Buildings.

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