AI News, This Robot Just Built A Launch Pad

This Robot Just Built A Launch Pad

So far, everything hurled beyond our atmosphere and into the great beyond was constructed on Earth, made by human hands or human-built machines using resources from sweet mother Terra herself.

Here’s how PISCES described the goal: The project is a first-of-its-kind in Hawaii and aims to robotically build a vertical take-off and landing pad using basalt found on the island.

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Robot-Built Landing Pad Could Pave the Way for Construction on Mars

2 0 MORE The Helelani rover built a prototype launch-and-landing pad on Hawaii's Big Island in late 2015.

The robotic rover, named Helelani, assembled the pad on Hawaii's Big Island late last year, putting together 100 pavers made of locally available material in an effort to prove out technology that could do similar work in space.

Instead of concrete for the landing pad, we're using lunar and Mars material, which is exactly like the material we have here on the Big Island — basalt,' Rob Kelso, executive director of the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration (PISCES) in Hawaii, told Hawaiian news outlet Big Island Now.

Doing so would be much cheaper and more efficient than hauling everything from Earth, advocates say, since it currently costs about $10,000 to launch every kilogram (2.2 lbs.) of payload from our planet's surface to orbit.

Error loading player: No playable sources found The ACME program fits into NASA's long-term vision, which sees robots and 3D printers smoothing humanity's way to Mars and other distant destinations — and helping prepare the off-Earth ground for astronauts' arrival.

they will eliminate or mitigate the dust storms that would otherwise result (and possibly damage space equipment and/or neighboring structures) during launch and landing operations.

This Robot Just Built A Launch Pad

So far, everything hurled beyond our atmosphere and into the great beyond was constructed on Earth, made by human hands or human-built machines using resources from sweet mother Terra herself.

Here’s how PISCES described the goal: The project is a first-of-its-kind in Hawaii and aims to robotically build a vertical take-off and landing pad using basalt found on the island.

This was part of NASA's larger Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project, which wants to use found materials on alien worlds, builder robots like this one, and 3D printing, to build structures without needing to bring all the parts from Earth.

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SpaceX close to landing rocket boosters next to its Southern California launch site

SpaceX, which has launched three rockets this year from Vandenberg Air Force Base and landed all three boosters on an off-shore barge, has built a permanent landing pad at the base to replace ocean recoveries.

While SpaceX hopes to rely on it for most West Coast landings, it also proposed to operate a second Pacific Ocean landing barge 31 miles off the Santa Barbara County coastline to recover boosters diverted from the ground by sensitive base operations.

On Thursday morning, SpaceX returned its 16th launched booster to its only ground-based landing pad — Landing Zone 1 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida — minutes after delivering the Air Force’s secretive X-37B space plane into orbit.

“It looks like something out of science fiction.” SpaceX first managed to bring back a booster intact nearly two years ago, following several failures that resulted in exploded 16-story-tall boosters catching fire and falling into the ocean.

Growing pains Despite devastating explosions that destroyed the company’s signature Falcon 9 rockets in June 2015 and September 2016, SpaceX launched more payloads to orbit this year that ever before.

Environmental concerns In addition to the new landing pad at Vandenberg, SpaceX has proposed a backup at-sea barge platform off Santa Barbara to land boosters in case of conflicts on land.

The ground landing pad at the base “is the preferred landing location, (but) SpaceX has identified the need for a contingency landing action that would be exercised if there were critical assets on (the Air Force base) that would not permit an over-flight of the first stage,” the NOAA Fisheries’ review concluded.

Air pollution from the rocket’s engine burns to navigate back to Earth would be released about 3,000 feet above the ground “and would not have the potential to affect ambient air quality,” the FAA’s determination states.

“The U.S. Air Force determined an explosion on the drone ship would not … have a significant impact on marine mammals.” Any fuel released in an explosion would be quickly evaporated, according to the reviews.

This Self-Sustaining Robot Will Print Your Martian Home Out of Ice

“I had absolutely gone into naturopathy thinking this alternative system of medicine was a better way to go.” Naturopathy is a form of alternative medicine that primarily uses dietary and herbal remedies to treat patients.

She was thrilled to land a job at a clinic that took a holistic, integrative approach to patient care, offering not only naturopathic medicine but also chiropractic care, acupuncture, and massage therapy.

In the span of a few days, Hermes found evidence that naturopathy was rife with problems, and practitioners who would knowingly give patients unapproved drugs, suggest expensive treatments for all kinds of ailments, and put profits over patients.

It was really hard to process.” She made it her mission to learn as much as she could about the underbelly of the naturopathic world, Through this journey, she began sharing what she learned online and calling out examples of unethical behavior in the naturopathic world.

In North Dakota, she twice encouraged lawmakers to vote down a bill that would have allowed naturopathic doctors to prescribe pharmaceuticals, perform minor surgery, and practice midwifery.

“When a PhD opportunity came up to study how our genes might be interacting with our skin microbiome and, to see if it’s possible to manipulate these interactions in a therapeutic function, I felt like I was right where I was always supposed to be.” ADVERTISEMENT Humans of the Year is a series about the people building a better future for everyone.