AI News, The first wireless flying robotic insect takes off

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes off

Wing flapping is a power-hungry process, and both the power source and the controller that directs the wings are too big and bulky to ride aboard a tiny robot.

They pointed the laser beam at a photovoltaic cell, which is attached above RoboFly and converts the laser light into electricity.

That's why the team designed a circuit that boosted the seven volts coming out of the photovoltaic cell up to the 240 volts needed for flight.

'The microcontroller acts like a real fly's brain telling wing muscles when to fire,' said co-author Vikram Iyer, a doctoral student in the UW Department of Electrical Engineering.

'On RoboFly, it tells the wings things like 'flap hard now' or 'don't flap.'' Specifically, the controller sends voltage in waves to mimic the fluttering of a real insect's wings.

'To make the wings flap forward swiftly, it sends a series of pulses in rapid succession and then slows the pulsing down as you get near the top of the wave.

While RoboFly is currently powered by a laser beam, future versions could use tiny batteries or harvest energy from radio frequency signals, Gollakota said.

'You could buy a suitcase full of them, open it up, and they would fly around your building looking for plumes of gas coming out of leaky pipes.

Watch a laser-powered RoboFly flap its tiny wings

He’s obviously very concerned with power efficiency — last month he and his colleagues published a way of transmitting video with 99 percent less power than usual.

“To make the wings flap forward swiftly, it sends a series of pulses in rapid succession and then slows the pulsing down as you get near the top of the wave.

At present the bot just takes off, travels almost no distance and lands — but that’s just to prove the concept of a wirelessly powered robot insect (it isn’t obvious).

The next steps are to improve onboard telemetry so it can control itself, and make a steered laser that can follow the little bug’s movements and continuously beam power in its direction.

RoboFly Is the First Wireless Insectoid Robot to Take Flight

Drones come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but very small flying robots are hard to make for a variety of reasons.

Still, swarms of little, cheap robots could be ideal for tasks like environmental surveys or hunting down gas leaks.

If you want an insect-sized flying robot, an insect-like style of flight might be the best option from a physics standpoint.

The aptly named RoboFly has a small photoelectric panel atop a long wire extending from the device’s main circuit board.

The team designed a circuit board with a boost converter that can increase the output to 240 volts for a short time to flap the wings.

The team hopes that future versions of the RoboFly will include an adjustable laser power system, allowing the robot to fly freely.

Insect robot developed with flapping wings but not a leash

RoboFly, the first wireless insect-sized flying robot, is slightly heavier than a toothpick.

The robot called 'RoboFly' with independent flaps used a tiny onboard circuit that converts the laser energy into enough electricity to operate its wings, according to a news release of the university on Tuesday.

To make RoboFly wireless, the engineers designed a flexible circuit (yellow) with a boost converter (copper coil and black boxes at left) that boosts the seven volts coming from the photovoltaic cell into the 240 volts needed for flight.

The engineers said the engineering challenge was the flapping since wing flapping was a power-hungry process, and both the power source and the controller that directs the wings were too big and bulky to ride aboard a tiny robot.

So they designed a circuit that boosted the seven volts coming out of the photovoltaic cell up to the 240 volts needed for flight.

'To make the wings flap forward swiftly, it sends a series of pulses in rapid succession and then slows the pulsing down as you get near the top of the wave.

To power RoboFly the engineers pointed an invisible laser beam (shown here in red laser) at a photovoltaic cell, which is attached above the robot and converts the laser light into electricity.

See How This Wireless Flying Robotic Insect Can Take Off And Land

Slightly more substantial than a wooden toothpick, engineers from the University of Washington have created a robot insect that can fly untethered.

Dubbed the RoboFly, the engineers gave the robotic flying insecta brain (a microcontroller) and offset the need for heavy electronics traditionally used to power miniature robotics by powering it with a laser beam.

In addition to the RoboFly's brain which gives it control over its own wings, the team created a circuit board that would boost the volts coming out of the photovoltaic cell from 7 volts to the 240 volts it needs to be airborne.

They put a microcontroller on the same circuit which tells the fly to flap its wings or flap its wings harder, etc., by sending voltage in waves mimickingthe fluttering of real insect's wings.

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