AI News, The Cybersecurity 202: Companies are trying to crack down on ... artificial intelligence

Uniting Georgia's Technology Community

Since its inception, Xtreme Solutions has been on the front lines of protecting citizens from cyber security threats, having worked with some of the largest government entities and Fortune 500 companies to ward off cyber attacks, thwart hijacks, and prevent data breaches that result in millions of dollars lost and countless lives ruined.

Come hear Xtreme Solutions speak about the future of cyber security, the latest threats, and how YOU can take advantage of—and be rewarded for—staying up-to-date and be proactive in protecting individuals and companies from the latest cyber security attacks.

Ingram, Jr., Founder and President of Xtreme Solutions, is responsible for the overall technological direction of Xtreme Solutions, development of IT strategies that sets out the strategic direction for Xtreme Solutions, and providing strategic and tactical planning, development, evaluation, and coordination of the information and technology systems and services for Xtreme Solutions and its clients.

As President, Mr. Ingram has built a responsive IT organization that consistently delivers results by aligning technology initiatives with business goals, with substantial improvement to service delivery, standardization, and business/systems performance.

As a contractor for the Army Radi has worked on various hi tech projects and his most successful thus far has been creating virtual training environments a.k.a, cyber range.

These same simulated computer networks are highly sought after today especially by large organizations wishing to assess the technical skill of their current employees.

Since its inception, Xtreme Solutions has been on the front lines of protecting citizens from cyber security threats, having worked with some of the largest government entities and Fortune 500 companies to ward off cyber attacks, thwart hijacks, and prevent data breaches that result in millions of dollars lost and countless lives ruined.

Come hear Xtreme Solutions speak about the future of cyber security, the latest threats, and how YOU can take advantage of—and be rewarded for—staying up-to-date and be proactive in protecting individuals and companies from the latest cyber security attacks.

Ingram, Jr., Founder and President of Xtreme Solutions, is responsible for the overall technological direction of Xtreme Solutions, development of IT strategies that sets out the strategic direction for Xtreme Solutions, and providing strategic and tactical planning, development, evaluation, and coordination of the information and technology systems and services for Xtreme Solutions and its clients.

As President, Mr. Ingram has built a responsive IT organization that consistently delivers results by aligning technology initiatives with business goals, with substantial improvement to service delivery, standardization, and business/systems performance.

As a contractor for the Army Radi has worked on various hi tech projects and his most successful thus far has been creating virtual training environments a.k.a, cyber range.

These same simulated computer networks are highly sought after today especially by large organizations wishing to assess the technical skill of their current employees.

Facebook, Google face tough questions over white nationalism

'These platforms are utilized as conduits to spread vitriolic hate messages into every home and country,' Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrod Nadler (D-N.Y.) said during his opening remarks. 'Efforts by media companies to counter this surge have fallen short, and social network platforms continue to be used as ready avenues to spread dangerous white nationalist speech.'

Potts said Facebook's policies dictate 'white supremacists are not allowed on the platform under any circumstances,' noting that Facebook has been increasing its efforts to remove hate content in the last few years.  Facebook two weeks ago announced a new ban on 'white nationalist' and 'white separatist' content, which it had previously allowed on the platform.

He noted that Facebook removes white nationalists 'reactively,' when users report them, but also engages in 'some proactive surfacing of those to human reviewers' who determine whether posts should be removed.  Walden touted Google's artificial intelligence tools, which are trained to remove violent and extreme content that violates Google-owned YouTube's community guidelines.

Walden responded by describing Google's new policy limiting recommendations of 'borderline' content, an effort to limit the reach of conspiracy theories on the platform.  But in a moment that illuminated the complicated issues at hand, YouTube was forced to shut down a chat feature on a livestream of the hearing. The feature was disabled 'due to the presence of hateful comments,” Google confirmed to The Hill.

Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalProgressives threaten to derail major Dem spending proposal Facebook, Google face tough questions over white nationalism Strong 'Medicare for All' legislation is like bargaining a strong union contract MORE (D-Wash.) asked the company representatives if they would submit to third-party civil rights audits, while others pressed the tech companies to coordinate in taking down white nationalist content the same way they coordinate to remove content from ISIS and al Qaeda.

Owens criticized Democrats for holding the hearing, saying it was an attempt to frighten minorities ahead of the 2020 presidential election.  Democratic lawmakers countered by accusing President TrumpDonald John TrumpKoch network launches ad campaign opposing Trump's proposed gas tax Trump laments EU 'being so tough' on Brexit Inslee knocks Trump for wind turbine remarks MORE and other elected officials of fueling and empowering white nationalist individuals and groups, which often espouse anti-immigrant views.

'I worry that the majority’s true motivation for this hearing is to suggest Republicans are hateful, dishonest and somehow connected to those characters who truly spew hatred and act on it in the public square,' Collins said.  Lawmakers made it clear they would watch tech companies closely as they addressed these issues.

Facebook, Google face widening crackdown over online content

Social media giants like Facebook and Google came under increasing pressure in Europe on Monday when countries proposed stricter rules to force them to block extreme material such as terrorist propaganda and child porn.

And a European Union parliamentary committee approved a bill giving internet companies an hour to remove terror-related material or face fines that could reach into the billions.

The U.S., where government action is constrained by the First Amendment right to free speech and freedom of the press, has taken a more hands-off approach, though on Tuesday, a House committee will press Google and Facebook executives on whether they are doing enough to curb the spread of hate crimes and white nationalism.

The offense would be punishable by three years in prison and a fine of 10.5 million Australian dollars ($7.5 million), or 10% of the platform’s annual revenue, whichever is larger.

The plan, which includes the creation of an independent regulator funded by a tax on internet companies, will be subject to public comment for three months before the government publishes draft legislation.

Britain will consider imposing financial penalties similar to those under the EU’s online data privacy law, which permits fines of up to 4% of a company’s annual worldwide revenue, Wright said.

Under the EU legislation that cleared an initial hurdle in Brussels, any internet companies that fail to remove terrorist content within an hour of being notified by authorities would face similar 4% penalties.

It faces heavy opposition from digital rights organizations, tech industry groups and some lawmakers, who said the 60-minute deadline is impractical and would lead companies to go too far and remove even lawful material.