AI News, Squarespace Review

Inside the European Tour’s fitness wellness Truck

After losing his game and his love for golf, he’s back in the winners’ circle and playing better than ever.

Airbus-Proximus consortium receives long-term support maintenance contract for Belgian Astrid network

SDBR: On June 1, you named the new company Lynred, resulting from the merger between ULIS-Sofradir: What’s behind the name?

The Lynred logo—which incorporates the eye that was already a part of our companies’ visual identities—was designed to express precision, support, teamwork, protection, trust and vision.

The company boasts 1,000 employees, mostly based in Grenoble, and generates annual revenue of €225 million (43% on the defense market, 34% on the industrial market, 12% on the civil aeronautics and space markets, and 11% on the consumer goods market).

Apple Addresses Siri Privacy Protections

With this app, Kolide will notify users or groups when a device is out of compliance along with clear instructions about what is wrong, and step by step instructions to remediate the issue themselves.

Your users will know what data is collected about their device, who can see that data, and can even view the full source code of the agent that is run on the device.

Kolide is already used by hundreds of fast growing companies who want to level-up their device security without locking down their devices.

One of the things we train on is to dispel inaccurate rumors and ultimately that is what was occurring — ultimately what the Alabama office did is provide a forecast with their tweet, that is what they get paid to do.” Even if you’re an outright bigot (and if you voted for him, you are) you ought to be outraged by Trump at this point.

Coverage of Google’s report created the impression that only iOS users were hacked, when in fact, the Chinese government also exploited Windows and Android users, and that these exploits may have been targeting people everywhere.

He predicted both of the things Mark Gurman reported today: the return of Touch ID via an in-screen fingerprint sensor, and a new iPhone SE based on the iPhone 8.

If Apple follows the same playbook, this new iPhone would have the A13 chip we expect to see in next week’s new iPhones — the iPhone 8 has an A11 that will soon be two years old.

Bloomberg, of course, is the publication that published “The Big Hack” last October — a sensational story alleging that data centers of Apple, Amazon, and dozens of other companies were compromised by China’s intelligence services.

The story presented no confirmable evidence at all, was vehemently denied by all companies involved, has not been confirmed by a single other publication (despite much effort to do so), and has been largely discredited by one of Bloomberg’s own sources.

Bloomberg’s institutional credibility is severely damaged, and everything they publish should be treated with skepticism until they retract the story or provide evidence that it was true.

My experiment with leaving my DMs open to everyone on Twitter has been successful, by the way — very little spam, very high signal-to-noise from folks whom I don’t follow (who, if my DMs were not open, wouldn’t be able to DM me).

(If you Command-Option-click a folder in the Dock it will open that folder, rather than reveal that folder in its parent folder.) Also useful: you can click on a folder in the Dock (Downloads is one I use this with frequently) and then Command-click on one of the items in the menu listing the folder’s contents.

And in document-based apps, you can Command-click on the document’s proxy icon in the window’s title bar and you’ll get a pop-up menu showing the folder hierarchy of the document’s location in the file system.

Someone told me why this idiot made this change, but damned if I can remember or figure it out, because it doesn’t seem like the Finder in Mojave or Catalina uses ⌘R or ⌘L for anything else.

(Apple still has support documents with the old shortcuts.) Update to Sidenote: Thanks to a few readers for reminding me — starting with 10.14 Mojave, ⌘R and ⌘L are now used for rotating images right and left.

I couldn’t find the shortcuts because (a) they only work when an image file is selected, and (b) they don’t have commands in the Finder’s menu bar, another bit of UI lunacy.

And to top this all off — truly, this is genuinely hard to believe — these ⌘R and ⌘L shortcuts not only break 27-year-old Finder shortcuts, but they aren’t even consistent with Photos, which uses ⌘R for “Rotate Counterclockwise” and ⌥⌘R for “Rotate Clockwise”.

OK, OK, I Swear This One Really Is the Last Update: Another good Command-click trick — which dates back at least to System 7 in 1991, and possibly earlier — is that you can Command-click on any window in the background and drag it around without bringing the window forward.

Sam Wood, reporting for The Philadelphia Inquirer: In the days before the November 2016 election, two Haverford College students came within a hair’s breadth of prising Donald Trump’s tax returns from a government database.

Andrew Harris, 24, is scheduled to admit on Thursday that he used a student financial aid site in a failed attempt to access Trump’s most-guarded financial documents.

And Google no longer visually styles paid results distinctively from actual search results — just the little “Ad” icon before the result URL.

The whole month of September is usually the busiest of the year, for the obvious reason that it’s when Apple holds its biggest product announcements of the year.

If you ever needed proof that I have unusual taste in games and a preternatural knack for regular expressions, look no further than the fact that I love this site.

What makes this case so unusual is that these sort of exploits are worth millions of dollars, and they are typically used very selectively to target individuals.

Detailed analysis by Josh Centers at TidBITS on Apple’s increasing use of “•••” ellipsis buttons to show “more” in iOS: The broader issue here in terms of usability isn’t the philosophical

You pick the left and right shoe that feels best — a size 9 for your left foot and a 9.25 for your right, for example — and return the rest for free.

It looks and feels and acts exactly how a modern Mac app should — and at same time it feels and acts exactly like the NetNewsWire of a decade ago.

The UHD Alliance, in conjunction with a large number of the best filmmakers working today: Filmmakers, Hollywood Studios, consumer electronics companies and the UHD Alliance have collaborated to make this next-level home theater viewing experience possible.

motion smoothing, etc.) and preserving the correct aspect ratios, colors and frame rates, Filmmaker Mode enables your TV to display the movie or television show’s content precisely as it was intended by the filmmaker.

Apple Newsroom: Apple today announced a new repair program, offering customers additional options for the most common out-of-warranty iPhone repairs.

Apple will provide more independent repair businesses — large or small — with the same genuine parts, tools, training, repair manuals and diagnostics as its Apple Authorized Service Providers (AASPs).

Apple retail stores have proven to be spectacularly successful hubs for selling new products, but nobody talks about taking broken stuff to the Apple Store with any enthusiasm.

Perhaps Apple should focus even more on what it does best—selling shiny new stuff—and let the rest of the professional repair world help support its customers.

Brought to you by these fine sponsors: Aaron Rupar, reporting for Vox: President Donald Trump wants to host 2020’s G7 meeting of international leaders at Trump Doral in Florida, a private club he still owns and profits from — a move that would serve as perhaps the starkest illustration yet of how Trump is normalizing corruption.

Basically, I think we need to get used to WWDC announcements being a roadmap for the next year of OS releases, not a list of what’s going to ship in the initial dot-zero release in the fall.

Dom DiFurio, writing for The Dallas Morning News: Analysis from Fort Worth-based Buxton Live Mobile Insights sheds light on where Chick-Fil-A customers go on Sunday when the restaurant is closed. The company tracked location data from the mobile devices of customers on Chick-fil-A properties Monday through Saturday, and then studied where those same customers ate on Sundays.

Buxton told The Dallas Morning News it “purchases and analyzes consumer location data from multiple data aggregators where the data is collected from mobile devices which have pre-opted in to location services tracking.” The story is ostensibly about fried chicken, but the fact that a marketing firm is tracking people like this is so fucked up.

There’s a reason over 1 million people start their day with Morning Brew — the daily email that delivers the latest news from Wall Street to Silicon Valley.

[…] Google is trying to thread a needle here, implying that some level of tracking is consistent with both the original design intent for web technology and user privacy expectations.

If the benchmark is original design intent, let’s be clear: cookies were not supposed to enable third-party tracking, and browsers were supposed to block third-party cookies.

Similarly, if the benchmark is user privacy expectations, let’s be clear: study after study has demonstrated that users don’t understand and don’t want the pervasive web tracking that occurs today.

Trachtenberg and Lillian Rizzo, reporting for The Wall Street Journal: News Corp is developing a news-aggregation service meant to address concerns that Alphabet Inc.’s Google News and other digital platforms don’t reward publishers’ work adequately and play down articles from certain types of sites, according to people familiar with the plans.

My first instinct was to make fun of this: This is no big deal, because it’s not like anyone uses a leather wallet or wears denim jeans.

If Apple Card gets genuinely sloppy-looking after carrying it like you would any other card — if it’s atypically prone to staining or scratching — that’s a problem.

I hadn’t seen this before, and both Jobs (on the potential of personal computers, and their inevitable ubiquity — at a time when only 1 in 1,000 U.S. households owned one) and his counterpart David Burnham (who, even then, was deeply concerned about the privacy implications of computing) are remarkably prescient.

The user’s privacy comes first, and if there is commercial collateral damage from that, fuck it: WebKit will do its best to prevent all covert tracking, and all cross-site

I think Google could aggressively close these same privacy-invasive loopholes without losing their ability to serve targeted ads — they’d simply be limited to serving targeted ads to users who sign into Chrome with their Google accounts.

Bloomberg, of course, is the publication that published “The Big Hack” last October — a sensational story alleging that data centers of Apple, Amazon, and dozens of other companies were compromised by China’s intelligence services.

The story presented no confirmable evidence at all, was vehemently denied by all companies involved, has not been confirmed by a single other publication (despite much effort to do so), and has been largely discredited by one of Bloomberg’s own sources.

Bloomberg’s institutional credibility is severely damaged, and everything they publish should be treated with skepticism until they retract the story or provide evidence that it was true.

Interesting tidbit from the BBC: 007 fans may be aware that famed Bond producer Cubby Broccoli was also behind a 1958 prisoner of war film called No Time To Die (which was also known as Tank Force).