AI News, Robots Learning Better Ways to Ask Clueless Humans for Help

Robots Learning Better Ways to Ask Clueless Humans for Help

If you're a robot, it turns out to be surprisingly difficult to get a human to assist you with tasks, so researchers at MIT are teaching robots to politely ask for very specific kinds of help.

It's not always obvious to the human what kind of help the robots needs, however, which is why these robots are using an inverse semantic algorithm to generate human-friendly requests for help:

The robots are able to detect failures by themselves, determine exactly what sort of help they need, and then translate those requests into something understandable and actionable by a human.

Giving robots the ability to recognize these failures and then intelligently ask for assistance could open up many more tasks to at least partial automation, and it's likely to have the most impact in variable, unstructured environments.

Moral Math of Robots: Can Life and Death Decisions Be Coded?

A self-driving car has a split second to decide whether to turn into oncoming traffic or hit a child who has lost control of her bicycle. An autonomous drone needs to decide whether to risk...

RT Podcast: Ep. 465 - Trailers Spoil Every Movie

Join Gus Sorola, Gavin Free, Blaine Gibson, and Burnie Burns as they discuss trailers, comic book movies, what's too much water, and more on this week's RT Podcast! This episode originally...

One Robot for Every Task - Daniela Rus, MIT - Wednesday Plenary Session ICRA 2015

One Robot for Every Task - Daniela Rus, MIT Plenary - May 27th, 2015 Abstract: The digitization of practically everything coupled with advanced robotics promises a future with democratized...

Critical Role Extra - The Return of Liam!

Check out our store for official Critical Role merch: Catch Critical Role live Thursdays at 7PM PT on Alpha and Twitch: Alpha: Twitch:

How robots learn to communicate efficiently

An experiment led at EPFL and UNIL (Université de Lausanne) by Steffen Wischmann, Dario Floreano and Laurent Keller showed that "simple" robots equipped with a neural controller and an artificial...

Yelawolf - Till It’s Gone

iTunes: Sign up for updates: Music video by Yelawolf performing Till It's Gone. (C) 2014 Interscope Records Best of Yelawolf:.

Fermi Paradox: Stay At Home Civilizations

Today we return to the Fermi Paradox to contemplate the notion of civilizations which neither expand outwards to colonize the galaxy nor go extinct, but exist as long-term, high-tech civilizations...

"How to Survive a Robot Uprising" - Daniel H. Wilson...

Daniel H. Wilson discusses his book "How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips On Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion". This video is part of the Google Author Series - filmed at Google...

What's Next at MIT with Daniela Rus (MIT CSAIL)

TechCrunch Sessions: Robotics is a single-day event designed to facilitate in-depth conversation and networking with the technologists, researchers and students of the robotics community as...