AI News, Robots Build Large Structures With Brick and Concrete

Robots Build Large Structures With Brick and Concrete

Industrialrobots have been very successful at taking over some of the semi-skilled stuff in structured environments like factories, but other than in a few art projects, it’s relatively new to see industrial arms doing productive things out in the world, like laying bricks.

CalledContour Crafting, this fabrication technology was developed at the University of Southern California, and its creators estimate that construction using this system could reduce costs by 80 percent (!) while eliminating waste.

It’s nice that the robots are able to account (sometimes) for the space necessary for wires and pipesand stuff like that, but actually putting that infrastructure in place is still a task that requires a skilled human.

Having said that, the number of humans who are learning skills like bricklaying appears to be decreasing significantly, so in the long term, rather than thinking of robots like this as taking jobs away from people, think of them as filling in for people as the human-driven construction workforce shrinks.

Bet You Didn’t See This Coming: 10 Jobs That Will Be Replaced By Robots

Once thought indispensable to a company, keen-eyed financial analysts could spot a trend before it happened, allowing institutions to adjust their portfolios and potentially make billions of dollars.

But human financial analysts can no longer compete with artificially intelligent financial analysis software that can read and recognize trends in historic data to predict future market moves.

It’s no wonder that financial analyst jobs could be the worst hit in the estimated 30% of banking sector jobs lost to AI in the next five to 10 years.

As robots become more advanced, they are capable of performing actions that previously required a pair of eyeballs, such as managing inventory on a store shelf.

While robots like Tally can cost retailers tens of thousands up front, chains stand to save hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars over the long run because, unlike humans, robots don’t get sick, need holidays, require a 401(k) payment, and can be retrained in an instant with a simple software update.

Human Vs. Robot: Bricklaying Robot Can Place 1,000 Bricks an Hour

Building houses of brick is almost as old as human civilization itself, and over the millennia, we’ve perfected the art.

Mark Pivac, inventor of the bricklaying robot, Hadrian, told PerthNow that his bot can place 1,000 bricks an hour, enough to erect the walls of a house in two days of round-the-clock work—a task that, on average, takes a human crew four to six weeks of hard labor.

Instead of extruding plastic or sintering metal, it cuts bricks to size, mortars them, and precisely lays each in place using a grasper at the end of a 28 meter telescopic boom.

The robot requires three human handlers: an operator, a tender to keep it supplied with bricks and mortar, and a mason to clean up and fine tune things after the robot passes.

“The problem is the average age of bricklayers is going up and it’s difficult to attract new young people to the trade.” There’s a debate on about the future of automation—what it means that machines may be able to match humans at virtually any task.

Designing the Brick Wall of the Future

Constructing it would be tedious and technically demanding work indeed, requiring numerous jigs and repeated measurements, not to mention an unusually skilled mason.

You can easily, interactively explore parametric variations of your ideas, and you can bring the wealth of functions built into Mathematica to bear on the problem, to explore ideas that are on, or beyond, the fringes of what would be possible with other programs. There

are lots of possible effects to investigate: displacing bricks, rotating them, leaving gaps between them, creating ledges of various depths for shadow effects, combining bricks of various colors, and so on.

I was thinking about the effects that could be achieved by slightly displacing bricks, it occurred to me that stereograms work similarly: by varying the displacements of corresponding points in left and right images, a stereogram gives the illusion of three dimensions.

With the precision placement of bricks made possible by a robot, it ought to be possible to build a flat wall that would undulate in 3D when viewed as a stereogram.

wanted to construct a brick wall with bricks displaced from the plane of the wall by an amount given by a function of the bricks’

This doubly curved wall derives its visual interest from the interactions of the horizontal and vertical curvatures as well as the patterns the bricks assume on the variously angled surfaces. A

surface function that is sinusoidal at the bottom and grades smoothly to a straight course of bricks at the top gives a pleasing curtain effect. By

variety of effects you can achieve is limited only by your inventiveness in creating surface functions, although if the displacement of the bricks is too large, the bricks will disengage and the wall will fall apart.

More sophisticated methods of laying the bricks would permit greater displacement from the plane of the wall, but I wanted to keep things simple in this initial exploration. Here

I created that function using ListInterpolation after applying Transpose to the image data to account for a difference in the treatment of rows and columns between Image and Plot3D.

I fed that surface function to BrickPlot, but I reduced the displacement of the bricks because I liked the idea of a subtle message that is revealed by the sun when it rakes across the wall at a shallow angle. In

Within SketchUp, I positioned the wall for maximum effect with respect to the path of the sun, and made this animation of the appearance of the wall in the course of a summer day. That’s

Constructing it would be tedious and technically demanding work indeed, requiring numerous jigs and repeated measurements, not to mention an unusually skilled mason.

You can easily, interactively explore parametric variations of your ideas, and you can bring the wealth of functions built into Mathematica to bear on the problem, to explore ideas that are on, or beyond, the fringes of what would be possible with other programs.

There are lots of possible effects to investigate: displacing bricks, rotating them, leaving gaps between them, creating ledges of various depths for shadow effects, combining bricks of various colors, and so on.

I used a combination of horizontal and vertical sinusoids to govern the displacements, and modified my previous code to make this Manipulate, with which I could experiment with the sinusoid frequencies.

As I was thinking about the effects that could be achieved by slightly displacing bricks, it occurred to me that stereograms work similarly: by varying the displacements of corresponding points in left and right images, a stereogram gives the illusion of three dimensions.

With the precision placement of bricks made possible by a robot, it ought to be possible to build a flat wall that would undulate in 3D when viewed as a stereogram.

This doubly curved wall derives its visual interest from the interactions of the horizontal and vertical curvatures as well as the patterns the bricks assume on the variously angled surfaces.

surface function that is sinusoidal at the bottom and grades smoothly to a straight course of bricks at the top gives a pleasing curtain effect.

The variety of effects you can achieve is limited only by your inventiveness in creating surface functions, although if the displacement of the bricks is too large, the bricks will disengage and the wall will fall apart.

More sophisticated methods of laying the bricks would permit greater displacement from the plane of the wall, but I wanted to keep things simple in this initial exploration.

Finally, I fed that surface function to BrickPlot, but I reduced the displacement of the bricks because I liked the idea of a subtle message that is revealed by the sun when it rakes across the wall at a shallow angle.

Within SketchUp, I positioned the wall for maximum effect with respect to the path of the sun, and made this animation of the appearance of the wall in the course of a summer day.

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