AI News, Results matching “Robots Using ROS”

Results matching “Robots Using ROS”

As part of our 10-year anniversary, we've selected a few key early contributors and asked them about their experiences with ROS.

I found myself intrigued about robotics after watching the Star Wars trilogy on loop for the entire winter holiday when I was about 8 years old.

My dad (who is not an engineer) and I started the FIRST Team 1143 Cruzin' Comets in 2002 with the help of the community and three Lockheed Martin engineers who donated their time.

ROS runs down to the core of Rethink's robots: after receiving the state of the robot from the joint control boards, a ROS process then serves as our communication medium with the higher level motion planning framework and behavior tree.

Rethink's behavior tree and user interfaces are based on web technology with JavaScript and Node.js, so we built a new client library to facilitate integrating that technology into our ROS framework.

As a budding roboticist and open source enthusiast, I was thrilled that both complex robotics and open source code could exist in the same platform.

For far too long, robot software has been developed in isolation, with each new generation of roboticists needing to reinvent the wheel with a monolithic program that does everything.

While no individual piece of ROS will give you a fully functional robot software stack, taken together, and massaged a bit, a roboticist can 'apt-get install' their way to a viable robotics software architecture, and then spend more time focusing on building their own robot applications.

Larger robots typically usually use embedded hardware for commanding actuators and reading sensor values before communicating back with a more powerful host computer.

With smaller microcontrollers, ROS' memory and CPU footprint are too large to run properly, which is further compounded by ROS' lack of ability to communicate with the rest of the system in real time.

As it is currently written, I am able to expose some of the same interfaces on Baxter and Sawyer for researchers that the manufacturing software stack uses to control the robot, without modifying much of the robot's source code.

ROS Contributor Spotlight: Ian McMahon

As part of our 10-year anniversary, we've selected a few key early contributors and asked them about their experiences with ROS.

I found myself intrigued about robotics after watching the Star Wars trilogy on loop for the entire winter holiday when I was about 8 years old.

My dad (who is not an engineer) and I started the FIRST Team 1143 Cruzin' Comets in 2002 with the help of the community and three Lockheed Martin engineers who donated their time.

ROS runs down to the core of Rethink's robots: after receiving the state of the robot from the joint control boards, a ROS process then serves as our communication medium with the higher level motion planning framework and behavior tree.

Rethink's behavior tree and user interfaces are based on web technology with JavaScript and Node.js, so we built a new client library to facilitate integrating that technology into our ROS framework.

As a budding roboticist and open source enthusiast, I was thrilled that both complex robotics and open source code could exist in the same platform.

For far too long, robot software has been developed in isolation, with each new generation of roboticists needing to reinvent the wheel with a monolithic program that does everything.

While no individual piece of ROS will give you a fully functional robot software stack, taken together, and massaged a bit, a roboticist can 'apt-get install' their way to a viable robotics software architecture, and then spend more time focusing on building their own robot applications.

Larger robots typically usually use embedded hardware for commanding actuators and reading sensor values before communicating back with a more powerful host computer.

With smaller microcontrollers, ROS' memory and CPU footprint are too large to run properly, which is further compounded by ROS' lack of ability to communicate with the rest of the system in real time.

As it is currently written, I am able to expose some of the same interfaces on Baxter and Sawyer for researchers that the manufacturing software stack uses to control the robot, without modifying much of the robot's source code.

Rethink Robotics unveils Sawyer for Research and Education with Open Source SDK

Equipped with both the ROS system and a SDK (Software Development Kit), Sawyer for research and education will pave the way to innovations in fields like machine learning, human-robot interaction, mechatronics and grasping, machine vision and manufacturing skills.

Those robots add a real value to their users: For students/teachers: For researchers: Sawyer for Manufacturing comes with Intera software, a user friendly interface that will allow its user to quickly operate the robot.

This page will introduce you to the foundations of the Baxter SDK and teach you all the basics you need to know to start using and writing programs for your Baxter Research Robot.

This guide will give a brief summary of what the SDK is and the various parts of the system that make up the Baxter Research Robot platform.

These sections describe the hardware components of the robot and the foundation API layers upon which the SDK - and your programs - are built.

The SDK provides interfaces that control the robot hardware layer via the Robot Operating System (ROS) to any other computers on the robot's network.

By using the ROS network layer API, any client library or program that can 'speak ROS' can control the robot directly.

Now that you have your robot all set up and you've installed the Baxter SDK on your workstation and setup your ROS workspace environment, you will want to know more about working with the robot and using the workspace and tools to develop your own programs and research.

The Baxter Tools package contains helpful, command-line programs for working with Baxter on a day-to-day basis and also for executing robot maintenance and update tasks.