AI News, Make a massive, searchable online clothing store quickly with machinelearning

Make a massive, searchable online clothing store quickly with machinelearning

Make a massive, searchable online clothing store quickly with machine learning https://pixabay.com/en/people-woman-girl-clothing-eye-2563491/ You don’t have time to be learning how to make machine learning models, you’re a busy entrepreneur!

Let’s pretend you’re selling lots of clothes on your website, but you don’t necessarily have time to tag every new image that comes in.

For example, I downloaded several hundred photos of jeans, pants, shirts, tshirts, sweatshirts, skirts, dresses, and scarves.

used by startup’s object recognition model Tagbox because it only takes about 3 minutes to download and run.

I can now crunch through an unlimited number of images of clothing and extract searchable tags to enhance my product.

Make a massive, searchable online clothing store quickly with machinelearning

Make a massive, searchable online clothing store quickly with machine learning https://pixabay.com/en/people-woman-girl-clothing-eye-2563491/ You don’t have time to be learning how to make machine learning models, you’re a busy entrepreneur!

Let’s pretend you’re selling lots of clothes on your website, but you don’t necessarily have time to tag every new image that comes in.

For example, I downloaded several hundred photos of jeans, pants, shirts, tshirts, sweatshirts, skirts, dresses, and scarves.

used by startup’s object recognition model Tagbox because it only takes about 3 minutes to download and run.

I can now crunch through an unlimited number of images of clothing and extract searchable tags to enhance my product.

Machine Learning: Training vsTeaching

Your training data would be a large set of labeled images representing each fruit you want to be able to detect, typically a few thousand images per type.

For neural networks (very common for image classification), the training data is fed into the network via a layer of input units, which triggers layers of units (also referred to as nodes) beneath it, eventually arriving at the output units.

This lets you show the neural network inside each box something new, give it a label (such as a person’s name or a type of fashion), and teach it to recognize them in images it has never seen.

How teaching works Instead of training a model to solve a specific task like classifying Bananas vs Apples, we trained our neural network model (Tagbox) to know how to recognize visual patterns present in the world today.

Because our model already knows about the world of recognizing visual patterns, it doesn’t need to re-train the whole model to be able to perform well in recognizing new categories of images, it only has to re-map its knowledge to say: oh!

Your organization doesn’t necessarily have to hire a data scientists to put together a robust training set so that Tagbox can categorize your images by a new classification.

Another benefit is that you won’t have to spend an outrageous amount of money training with GPUs every time you want to teach your system a new task or a new face on your dataset.

Each box is a Docker container that you can run on your infrastructure, freeing you from having to use public endpoints from various cloud providers to develop with machine learning, or expensive GPUs to enable dynamic prediction based on ever-changing data.

Other Items of Interest

How to Add Borders,Overlays and Animations To Videos in iOS The preceding AVFoundation tutorial in this series, How to Play, Record, and Edit Videos in iOS received some great response from readers.

In fact, most readers wanted even more tips on advanced editing features that could add that extra touch of polish to their videos.

This follow-up AVFoundation tutorial is full of fresh new tricks to add some cool and professional effects to your videos.

This new AVFoundation tutorial will build upon that by teaching all you budding video editors how to add the following effects to your videos: Colored borders with custom sizes.

Each screen is accessible from the start screen, as seen in the screenshot below: The starter app contains a storyboard with basic setup of the five UIViews.

Note: If you are confused about the setup of the storyboards in the starter project, refer to the original tutorial, which shows you how to set up the storyboard for this particular app, or check out our Storyboards tutorial.

In the starter project, this method has no functionality implemented, so the exported video file will simply be identical to the original.

Most of the work to create your animation effects is done by Core Animation, so in most cases you simply need to set a few parameters on your animation object such as duration and transformation type.

Shifting the order of these layers means you can stack your video effects, such as displaying a background under your video, or placing an overlay on top.

The diagram below illustrates this concept: Since animation sequences can be added to CALayer objects, you’ll use this tactic to add animation to your videos.

Make a Run for the Border — Adding Borders to Videos Adding a border to your video is quite simple: you crop the video around the edges and place a colored background behind the video layer so that the color shows through the cropped sections.

You can then set the color of the background/border to whatever you wish, and you can also control the size of your border by simply adjusting the crop area.

This method creates a colored image matching the provided size by using standard drawing functions and then returns it.

borderImage = [self imageWithColor:[UIColor blueColor] rectSize:CGRectMake(0, 0, size.width, size.height)];

borderImage = [self imageWithColor:[UIColor redColor] rectSize:CGRectMake(0, 0, size.width, size.height)];

borderImage = [self imageWithColor:[UIColor greenColor] rectSize:CGRectMake(0, 0, size.width, size.height)];

borderImage = [self imageWithColor:[UIColor whiteColor] rectSize:CGRectMake(0, 0, size.width, size.height)];

} _colorSegment refers to the segmented control that lets the user pick the border color.

AVVideoCompositionCoreAnimationTool, the Core Animation class which handles the video post-processing, needs three CALayer objects for the video composition: a parent layer, a background layer, and a video layer.

size.width-(_widthBar.value*2), size.height-(_widthBar.value*2));

If you mix up the order of the background and the video, you’ll get a stunning rendition of a solid colored rectangle with no video to be seen anywhere!

videoCompositionCoreAnimationToolWithPostProcessingAsVideoLayer:videoLayer inLayer:parentLayer];

Note that even though you’re using Core Animation, there’s nothing actually being animated here — none of your objects move around on the screen.

Depending on the width and colors you picked, your video should look something like the following: Borders are nice, but you’re an aspiring video editor, and you’ve probably already started thinking “If I can add objects behind videos, surely I can also add them on top of videos!” :] You’re right — the next section deals with adding custom overlays to your video!

The starter project has three sample overlay images the user can choose from: Frame-1.png, Frame-2.png, and Frame-3.png, as seen below: Switch to AddOverlayViewController.m and find, the hopefully by now familiar, applyVideoEffectsToComposition:size: which should be empty.

videoCompositionCoreAnimationToolWithPostProcessingAsVideoLayer:videoLayer inLayer:parentLayer];

Going through the numbered comments above, you’ll find the following: The user is able to select which overlay image to use.

You should be rewarded with something like the following: You can add images behind of or in front of a video (or both at the same time) to generate all sorts of neat effects!

You know that the world will be dying to know the name of the genius behind all of these great effects — you :] You’ve probably guessed that adding titles to your video is as simple as adding another overlay to your video.

This is especially useful for video presentations or to make your videos fully accessible to those who don’t choose to (or aren’t able to) listen to the audio track.

videoCompositionCoreAnimationToolWithPostProcessingAsVideoLayer:videoLayer inLayer:parentLayer];

Just to be complete, though, here’s a rundown of the steps: CATextLayer, as the name suggests, is a CALayer subclass specifically designed for text layout and rendering.

Once the video is saved, go to your Photos app and you should see a subtitle at the bottom of your video, similar to the screen below: You can play around with the text and font settings in the code above and see the difference in the output.

Nothing Shifty About This Video — Add Tilt Effect to Videos The stacking of layers to create overlays is similar to multiple views stacked in a view hierarchy.

identityTransform.m34 = 1.0 / 1000;

identityTransform.m34 = 1.0 / -1000;

videoCompositionCoreAnimationToolWithPostProcessingAsVideoLayer:videoLayer inLayer:parentLayer];

The number at position (3,4) of the matrix (accessed by the m34 property) controls the amount of tilt, or how “squashed” the video appears.

Go find your video in your Photos app and check out the crazy tilt effect, much like the images below: If you don’t see a drastic difference between the original video and the tilted video after using the code above, try reducing the value in section #3 to something smaller like 100.

Or change the angle in section #4 from “M_PI/6.0” (that’s 30 degrees) to “M_PI/3” for an extreme 60 degree tilt!

try playing around with these to rotate around the y-axis (0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f) instead of the x-axis (1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f) or some other arbitrary vector.

sample star.png image is included in the starter project for you to use, and you’ll apply fading, rotating, and twinkling effects to the video using this image.

Okay, by now you can probably recite the next steps in your sleep :] Open AddAnimationViewController.m and add the code below to the empty implementation of applyVideoEffectsToComposition:size::

videoCompositionCoreAnimationToolWithPostProcessingAsVideoLayer:videoLayer inLayer:parentLayer];

Yes, that code block is significantly longer than the others :] Take some time to read through the breakdown below, in order to understand just what’s going on: There are two overlay layers, each with a star image.

This part’s the usual: set up the parent layer, the video layer, and the two overlay layers, then finally process it all via AVVideoCompositionCoreAnimationTool That’s it — build and run to see your latest and greatest effect at work!

Once the video has been saved to the photo library, you should be able to view it and see an animation running on top of your video like in the screens below: Okay, admittedly the static image above doesn’t do full justice to the effect — but an amazing video editor like yourself can always visualize these things, right?

And you should be able to take the basic principles from this tutorial and expand upon them to add many cool and interesting effects to your own videos.

Please let us know in the comments if this tutorial helped you to creating any great iOS apps, or if you were able to create some other amazing effect with help of this tutorial!

HTML and CSS

HTML By Examples 3.1 Example 1: Basic Layout of an HTML Document 3.2 Example 2: Lists and Hyperlinks 3.3 Example 3: Tables and Images 3.4 HTML Template 3.5 HTML Document Validator 3.6 Debugging HTML 4.

7.6 Types of CSS Selectors 7.7 Style Properties 7.8 Color Properties 7.9 Length Measurements 7.10 Box Model - Margin, Border, Padding and Content Area 7.11 Font Properties 7.12 Text Properties 7.13 Background Properties 7.14 List Properties 7.15 Table Properties 7.16 Image Properties 8.