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When you purchase a Certificate you get access to all course materials, including graded assignments.

Upon completing the course, your electronic Certificate will be added to your Accomplishments page - from there, you can print your Certificate or add it to your LinkedIn profile.

Introduction to Logic

When you purchase a Certificate you get access to all course materials, including graded assignments.

Upon completing the course, your electronic Certificate will be added to your Accomplishments page - from there, you can print your Certificate or add it to your LinkedIn profile.

Introduction to International Criminal Law

the Nuremberg trial to the case against Saddam Hussein, from the prosecution of Al-Qaeda terrorists to the trial of Somali pirates – no area of law is as important to world peace and security as international criminal law.

Taught by one of the world’s leading experts in the field, this course will educate students about the fundamentals of international criminal law and policy.

We will explore the contours of international crimes such as genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and piracy.

Each will include an assigned reading, typically an article or book chapter, as well as a simulation designed to bring the readings to life. I

In addition, students are invited to subscribe to “War Crimes Prosecution Watch,” a free bi-weekly e-newsletter that summarizes the latest developments in the field of international criminal law. --

Each unit is based on an online reading assignment, a video lecture of about one hour in length, and one or more role play exercises to stimulate on-line discussion.

The course also offers in-video enrichment quizzes (ungraded) for each unit, a ten question multiple choice midterm diagnostics exam (ungraded), and a ten question True/False Final Exam.

Free MOOCs? Forget aboutit.

Remember the halcyon days when MOOCs (massive, online open courses) were going to revolutionize the world, eliminating barriers of class and geography that were preventing hardworking, intelligent people from receiving—and benefitting from—an education?

The Verified Certificate (Signature Track) requires students to give Coursera access to their computer camersas, so Coursera can use facial recognition and typing pattern recognition technology to verify a student’s identity. This has advantages if an individual is seeking Continuing Education Units or similar professional credentials that require identity verification.

Back in the day, each successfully completed course was listed with a final grade, a link to a certificate, and a button the student could click to share the certificate on LinkedIn.

Fast forward to this morning, when I signed up for a new Coursera course and was greeted with this: The implication seemed clear: Coursera was no longer offering free certificates.

At first, though, it did look like a bait-and-switch. After completing registration for the above course, I went to its grading and logistics page, which said, “The Statements of Accomplishment (free) and Verified Certificates (signature track) will be provided to all those who achieve 50% or higher grade, and will be released within 1-2 weeks after the final submission deadline closes.

I’ll refrain from commenting about my chagrin at learning you only need a 50% to pass the course, and instead focus on the fact that, despite the above notice I received when signing up, it does seem to be offering free Statements of Accomplishment.

Coursera has a few decent arguments on its side: The problem is that Coursera hasn’t made those arguments, because there’s been no public discussion. And even if it did, it doesn’t fix the technical problems caused by the new policy that end up making courses less accessible.

For example, students who have old computers without cameras, or who rely on their phones to use the Coursera site, won’t be able to earn certificates even if they qualify for financial aid.

This could lead to students either paying for a course with money they can’t really afford to spend, or not taking a course at all under the belief that they won’t be able to share their accomplishment with anyone once they’ve completed it.

II

II Order my new book, Note To Self, here |

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