AI News, Kenshiro Robot Gets New Muscles and Bones

Kenshiro Robot Gets New Muscles and Bones

We’ve seen bio-inspired hummingbird robots, turtle robots, squirrel robots and more… enough to start an extremely profitable robot zoo.

Kenshiro’s body mirrors almost all the major muscles in a human, with 160 pulley-like 'muscles'—50 in the legs, 76 in the trunk, 12 in the shoulder, and 22 in the neck.

Kenshiro can get almost the same amount of joint torque as a human, with joint angular speed not quite at human level, at 70-100 degrees per second.

This time, instead of single point-to-point muscles, they decided to make planar muscles -- just check out Kenshiro's abs to understand what we mean.

All in all, these motors give Kenshiro 64 degrees of freedom (except for the hands): 13 in the neck, 13 in each arm, 7 in each leg, and 11 in the spine.

Its aluminum bones, including an impressive rib cage, are sturdier than previous 3D printed bones (breakage tended to be a problem), and its knee-joints include imitations of cruciate ligaments and a floating patella.

This Robot Has Better Muscles Than You Do

Forget Arnold Schwarzenegger or Tom Brady: the newest robots will take those strongmen’s muscle tone to task.

IEEE Spectrum reports: Kenshiro mimics the body of the average Japanese 12-year-old male, standing at 158 centimeters tall and weighing 50 kilograms.

Kenshiro’s body mirrors almost all the major muscles in a human, with 160 pulley-like “muscles”—50 in the legs, 76 in the trunk, 12 in the shoulder, and 22 in the neck.

For example, a 55 kg boy would have about a 5 kg thigh and 2.5 kg calf.

Kenshiro: Strong robot with 160 muscles.

The University of Tokyo has developed a tendon-controlled humanoid robot that is capable of very realistic humanlike movements.

During the development of the robot, the Japanese scientists used the human anatomy as its focus to create an artificial human that looks as natural as possible.

To imitate the very complex human anatomy made up of approximately 640 muscles, the scientists equipped Kenshiro with the most important human muscles: 50 in the legs, 76 in the torso, 12 in the shoulder and 22 in the neck.

It's simple: demonstrate a movement, he will then imitate it.A simple learning method, implemented by means of open source intelligent software and a mechanical interface.

A replica with the size of an adult would weigh approximately 100 kg which means a higher load, higher energy requirements and slower movements.

For those special muscles as in the abdominal and thoracic, only a single motor provides the necessary drive and it is that of the maxon brushless EC 16 and EC 22 motors.

These electronically commutated servo motors stand out with excellent torque characteristics, high dynamics, an extremely wide speed range, and their very long service life.

Kenshiro: Strong robot with 160 muscles.

The University of Tokyo has developed a tendon-controlled humanoid robot that is capable of very realistic humanlike movements.

During the development of the robot, the Japanese scientists used the human anatomy as orientation to create an artificial human that looks as natural as possible.

To imitate the human anatomy, the scientists equipped Kenshiro with the most important human muscles: 50 in the legs, 76 in the torso, 12 in the shoulder and 22 in the neck.

Kenshiro's 160 individual tendon-controlled “muscles” make many humanlike movement patterns possible, but the robot does not come close to copying all human movements, as the biological movement patterns of a human being is extremely complex.

Kenshiro's “bones” are made of aluminum and, as is the case in the human body, are movably connected to each other.,The 50 kg weight presented the biggest challenges to the scientists, led by Professor Masayuki Inaba.

For the contraction of special muscles, for example the abdominal muscle and thoracic muscles, only a single motor provides the necessary drive.

The electronically commutated servo motors stand out with excellent torque characteristics, high dynamics, an extremely wide speed range, and their very long service life.

Japanese researchers build robot with most humanlike muscle-skeleton structure yet (w/ video)

Their previous effort resulted in a robot they called Kojiro – a robot that demonstrated the huge strides that have come in mimicking the human body, as well as the very long road yet to travel.

In that effort the team found that simply adding artificial muscle and bones generally tended to create weight problems.

That caused the team to go back to the drawing board, this time with the idea of mimicking human bone and muscle at the individual body part level, i.e.

Each part was custom designed to fall within the weight parameters of actual human limbs and other parts of the body.

The result is a robot sized to approximate the average 12 year old Japanese boy – with bones made of aluminum that have been connected together in a way that very closely resembles the way human bones are connected, e.g.

Kenshiro has 160 muscles that are constructed using a single actuator motor for individual muscle groups with each consisting of a system of wires and moving pulleys.