AI News, Heart Surgeons Adapting to Robots

Heart Surgeons Adapting to Robots

What if you had a severely impaired heart, afflicted with an unpredictable rhythm, which could be treated only by lacing a catheter through the delicate avenues of your vasculature and up into the atria, where it would sear the tissue and leave a curative scar?

”You’re trying to drive the back end and steer the tip,” says Rick Green, vice president of marketing for Stereotaxis, a company that supplies cardiology labs with a robot called Niobe.

With the Stereotaxis device, surgeons must still manually guide the catheter through the arteries to the patient’s heart, but once the device is there, the Niobe system uses a set of external magnets to maneuver the metal tip of the catheter.

Each time it stops, the system records a point on the map, and every point that’s added enhances a topographical image of the heart on a computer screen.

TAP, TAP, TAP The catheter heart surgery robot automatically explores a heart chamber, mapping out it's electrical properties and looking for the cause of irregular heart beats.

Doctors who manually perform the operation without a robot’s help end up standing half bent over for long stretches, wearing a heavy lead smock.

For one thing, it is much less expensive to set up than Niobe, which requires that cardiology labs be fully renovated to shield the rest of the facility from the strong magnetic field that guides the robot.

Another cardiologist at the debate, Walid Saliba, from the Cleveland Clinic, explained that most of the complications in his own procedures were part of a natural learning curve and part of the process of figuring out how much force to use with a robotic system.

Judging by the vote, most doctors present were persuaded by Wazni’s request that we ”don’t blame the robot.” Although these systems could clearly be enhanced, he says, the human operators are the ones with the most to learn.

Stereotaxis Niobe: Robotic Cardiac Ablation

To learn more about Sterotaxis Niobe click here Valley Electrophysiologists Now Performing Robotic Cardiac Ablation Procedures The Valley Heart and Vascular Institute has completed its first robotic cardiac ablation procedure with the Stereotaxis Epoch™ Platform for complex cardiac conditions.

Epoch is a state-of-the-art computer controlled robotic navigation system that allows physicians to safely navigate in a patient’s heart to ablate diseased tissue causing cardiac arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats.

“We’ve been able to make tremendous advances, achieving unparalleled levels of success and safety for our patients.” More than five million people in the United States currently suffer from abnormal heart rhythms, known as arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats.

growing number of complex cardiac interventional procedures are driving the need for new technology that enables physicians to confidently treat areas of the heart previously unreachable or potentially unsafe with manual techniques.

Prof. Carlo Pappone atrial fibrillation ablation with stereotaxis magnetic navigation system

Prof. Carlo Pappone Performs atrial fibrillation ablation with stereotaxis remote magnetic navigation system and CARTO RMT non fluoroscopic mapping system. Esegue ablazione..

Prof. Carlo Pappone atrial fibrillation ablation with stereotaxis

Prof. Carlo Pappone Performs atrial fibrillation ablation with stereotaxis remote magnetic navigation system and CARTO RMT non fluoroscopic mapping system. Esegue ablazione..