AI News, Google's AI for detecting breast cancer beats doctors and ... artificial intelligence

MarketWatch site logo

IZOZF, +11.76%

(fra:1R3) The journal Nature published a study entitled "International evaluation of an AI system for breast cancer screening"

She was involved with the study and spoke to Wired, "AI programmes will not solve the human staffing crisis - as radiologists and imaging teams do far more than just look at scans - but they will undoubtedly help by acting as a second pair of eyes and a safety net."

It's clear from the number of FDA approved breast specific algorithms, the Google study, and the media response that resulted, that any technology improvement or assistance that can improve diagnostic capability is potentially disruptive, and that breast specific imaging and its improvement is a major priority.

The company has also established Izotropic Imaging Corp, a wholly owned Nevada based subsidiary that will manage operations in the U.S.A. Phone: 1-833-IZOCORP Email: info@izocorp.com Website: izocorp.com This document may contain forward-looking statements that are based on the Company's expectations, estimates and projections regarding its business and the economic environment in which it operates.

Google AI Can Now Detect Breast Cancer Better Than Doctors

The advent of artificial intelligence (AI) has brought a host of technologies that make everyday tasks easier.

The most widely used examples include providing more relevant internet searches, predicting the next word in a text message, identifying the face in a photo on social media, and routing commuters around trouble spots in traffic.

A study published in the scientific journal Nature showed that Google's AI system could detect breast cancer in mammograms more accurately than human radiologists.  This breakthrough could lead to better screening tools for those that don't yet have any signs of the disease.

Imperial Centre, Northwestern University, and Royal Surrey County Hospital to determine if a properly trained AI system could 'spot the signs of breast cancer more accurately.'  The researchers trained the AI system using mammograms from 15,000 women in the U.S. and 76,000 women in the United Kingdom (U.K.).

Research shows that half of all women who get a mammogram yearly will get at least one false positive over a 10-year period.  Detecting cancerous tissue in mammograms is particularly tricky because tumors are difficult to spot in the dense and overlapping tissue found in the breast.

In that study, the GoogLeNet AI system studied thousands of mammograms supplied by a Dutch university and identified malignant tumors with an 89% accuracy rate, compared to just 73% achieved by human pathologists.  The latest research takes the system to the next level, not only by detecting cancer but also by reducing the frequency of incorrect diagnoses.

Google AI Can Now Detect Breast Cancer Better Than Doctors

The advent of artificial intelligence (AI) has brought a host of technologies that make everyday tasks easier.

The most widely used examples include providing more relevant internet searches, predicting the next word in a text message, identifying the face in a photo on social media, and routing commuters around trouble spots in traffic.

A study published in the scientific journal Nature showed that Google's AI system could detect breast cancer in mammograms more accurately than human radiologists.  This breakthrough could lead to better screening tools for those that don't yet have any signs of the disease.

Imperial Centre, Northwestern University, and Royal Surrey County Hospital to determine if a properly trained AI system could 'spot the signs of breast cancer more accurately.'  The researchers trained the AI system using mammograms from 15,000 women in the U.S. and 76,000 women in the United Kingdom (U.K.).

Once the algorithms had been trained to detect breast cancer, they were tasked with searching for cancerous cells in mammograms of women who were already proven to have the disease, as a way to test the accuracy of the algorithm.

Research shows that half of all women who get a mammogram yearly will get at least one false positive over a 10-year period.  Detecting cancerous tissue in mammograms is particularly tricky because tumors are difficult to spot in the dense and overlapping tissue found in the breast.

In that study, the GoogLeNet AI system studied thousands of mammograms supplied by a Dutch university and identified malignant tumors with an 89% accuracy rate, compared to just 73% achieved by human pathologists.  The latest research takes the system to the next level, not only by detecting cancer but also by reducing the frequency of incorrect diagnoses.