AI News, Florida professor invents 'dronejacking' system artificial intelligence

Florida professor invents 'dronejacking' system

He came up with the idea after noticing an uptick in unauthorized drone sightings.“Reports of unmanned aircraft sightings (UAS) from pilots, citizens, and law enforcement have increased dramatically over the past five years,”

A 2018 study from the University of Dayton showed that should a drone crash into a commercial jet, the result could be dire.Drones also have been used for more nefarious actions, like the August assassination attempt on Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro.The threats drones pose aren’t limited to overseas lands.

Experts say Americans, too, are at risk of a drone terrorist attack.'The FBI assesses that, given their retail availability, lack of verified identification requirement to procure, general ease of use, and prior use overseas, UAS will be used to facilitate an attack in the United States against a vulnerable target, such as a mass gathering,' FBI Director Christopher A.

And the technology doesn't come cheaply.At upwards of $12 million, the cost of some of those systems can make them too expensive for smaller airports or private venues, said founder and CEO of Daytona Beach-based Drone Defense Systems LLC Sotirios George Kaminis, who is collaborating with ERAU to market the Dronejacker system.ERAU’s system doesn’t cause rogue drones to crash and it can be installed at a much lower cost, Kaminis said.How drone hijacking worksSong, who has degrees in computing, communications, control and transportation, said his multidisciplinary background allowed him to “develop novel ideas at the intersection”

Automated software would analyze the sound and if an unauthorized drone were detected, the system would use pattern-recognition algorithms to decipher the drone’s video-streaming channel, interrupting the broadcast with a warning message.If the message was ignored, the system would send the drone’s information to a computer control center equipped with an antenna that would cross-reference a registration safe list of sorts before transmitting a new signal to hijack the drone, Kaminis said.“It disrupts communication between the pilot and the drone,”

“It detects the drone, finds out what language the drone speaks, activates an emulation system that mimics the drone’s language, and snatches control away from the pilot.”The system would be fully autonomous, or totally independent of humans.

It would also follow the same screening procedures that military systems employ, Kaminis said.However, unlike military-grade systems, the technology isn’t considered a weapon and it doesn’t destroy the drone or cause it to crash, he added.As for the threat of using the technology to disable legitimate drones, like those used by emergency responders, Song said it would be unlikely because the technology would be incredibly hard to duplicate.There’s nothing quite like the system the on the market, Kaminis said.

The idea is so novel, Kaminis said he thought it could make history for ERAU.And if things go as planned, Volusia County would be at the center of it all.A Volusia County businessKaminis, himself an ERAU alumnus and former Daytona Beach resident, said he first was troubled by the potential damage drones can cause about six years ago.“Drones have been weaponized for several years now.

“Additionally, the growing sales of drones to the civilian population for legitimate use, pose an accidental risk to the safety and integrity of everyday operations such as commercial aviation.”After researching the issue extensively, he decided to act and founded his Daytona Beach company in 2016.“The services we offer include scalable, intelligent, autonomous systems that can accurately detect multiple drones and stop them dead in their tracks, period,”

Kaminis said he‘d be reaching out to local government leaders to see if there are any incentives to set-up shop locally.He said he plans to hire about six people over the next four to five months and then hire another 15-20 more when the updated product is ready to be manufactured.

'The FBI assesses that, given their retail availability, lack of verified identification requirement to procure, general ease of use, and prior use overseas, UAS will be used to facilitate an attack in the United States against a vulnerable target, such as a mass gathering,' FBI Director Christopher A.

If the message was ignored, the system would send the drone’s information to a computer control center equipped with an antenna that would cross-reference a registration safe list of sorts before transmitting a new signal to hijack the drone, Kaminis said.

University of Florida and UF Health announce $12 million gift from Orlando business leader to launch brain tumor research initiative

The Harris Rosen Foundation investment supports a multipartner collaboration focused on leading-edge brain tumor immunotherapy The University of Florida has received a $12 million gift from Orlando hotel magnate Harris Rosen and The Harris Rosen Foundation to advance innovative brain tumor immunotherapy research and care at UF Health and to launch an unprecedented partnership for the development of novel brain tumor treatments.

The Rosen gift is the cornerstone of a $100 million fundraising commitment to support the ReMission Alliance Against Brain Tumors, a groundbreaking, collaborative initiative led by UF that will unite world-leading neuro-oncology physicians and scientists in dynamic research and clinical trials.

The UF-organized Summit brings together more than 100 experts in neuro-oncology, tumor immunology, genetics, artificial intelligence, neuroimaging and bioinformatics to form an elite research community focused on achieving transformative outcomes for patients with brain tumors over the next decade.

“Their support of our research, patient care initiatives and the ReMission Alliance will allow us to leverage the power of the immune system to combat invasive brain cancers to dramatically improve the lives of brain tumor patients, here at UF and abroad.”

“I am confident that, together, we can advance the work necessary to provide extraordinary outcomes for patients suffering from malignant brain tumors and improve their survival rates and quality of life.

“Initiatives at the Cancer Center have become a centerpiece of UF Health’s overall research portfolio, which includes approximately $200 million per year in NIH funding and totals $450 million in sponsored program expenditures.”

These transformative commitments demonstrate how UF, as one of just a handful of global comprehensive universities, is positioned to leverage its research expertise and academic excellence to create lasting impact in the health care field and address major societal challenges.