AI News, Exclusive: Computer Virus Hits U.S. Drone Fleet

Exclusive: Computer Virus Hits U.S. Drone Fleet

computer virus has infected the cockpits of America's Predator and Reaper drones, logging pilots' every keystroke as they remotely fly missions over Afghanistan and other warzones.

'We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back,' says a source familiar with the network infection, one of three that told Danger Room about the virus.

Military network security specialists aren't sure whether the virus and its so-called 'keylogger' payload were introduced intentionally or by accident;

That raises the possibility, at least, that secret data may have been captured by the keylogger, and then transmitted over the public internet to someone outside the military chain of command.

Drones have become America's tool of choice in both its conventional and shadow wars, allowing U.S. forces to attack targets and spy on its foes without risking American lives.

And late last month, an American drone killed top terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki – part of an escalating unmanned air assault in the Horn of Africa and southern Arabian peninsula.

In the summer of 2009, U.S. forces discovered 'days and days and hours and hours' of the drone footage on the laptops of Iraqi insurgents.

The lion's share of U.S. drone missions are flown by Air Force pilots stationed at Creech, a tiny outpost in the barren Nevada desert, 20 miles north of a state prison and adjacent to a one-story casino.

But time and time again, the so-called 'air gaps' between classified and public networks have been bridged, largely through the use of discs and removable drives.

'We generally do not discuss specific vulnerabilities, threats, or responses to our computer networks, since that helps people looking to exploit or attack our systems to refine their approach,' says Lt. Col.

'We invest a lot in protecting and monitoring our systems to counter threats and ensure security, which includes a comprehensive response to viruses, worms, and other malware we discover.'

Exclusive: Computer Virus Hits U.S. Drone Fleet

computer virus has infected the cockpits of America's Predator and Reaper drones, logging pilots' every keystroke as they remotely fly missions over Afghanistan and other warzones.

'We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back,' says a source familiar with the network infection, one of three that told Danger Room about the virus.

Military network security specialists aren't sure whether the virus and its so-called 'keylogger' payload were introduced intentionally or by accident;

That raises the possibility, at least, that secret data may have been captured by the keylogger, and then transmitted over the public internet to someone outside the military chain of command.

Drones have become America's tool of choice in both its conventional and shadow wars, allowing U.S. forces to attack targets and spy on its foes without risking American lives.

And late last month, an American drone killed top terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki – part of an escalating unmanned air assault in the Horn of Africa and southern Arabian peninsula.

In the summer of 2009, U.S. forces discovered 'days and days and hours and hours' of the drone footage on the laptops of Iraqi insurgents.

The lion's share of U.S. drone missions are flown by Air Force pilots stationed at Creech, a tiny outpost in the barren Nevada desert, 20 miles north of a state prison and adjacent to a one-story casino.

But time and time again, the so-called 'air gaps' between classified and public networks have been bridged, largely through the use of discs and removable drives.

'We generally do not discuss specific vulnerabilities, threats, or responses to our computer networks, since that helps people looking to exploit or attack our systems to refine their approach,' says Lt. Col.

'We invest a lot in protecting and monitoring our systems to counter threats and ensure security, which includes a comprehensive response to viruses, worms, and other malware we discover.'

Wired for War

Blending historical evidence with interviews of an amaz­ing cast of characters, Singer shows how technology is changing not just how wars are fought, but also the politics, economics, laws, and the ethics that surround war itself.

Tech

SCIENCE U.S. Military Drones Infected With Mysterious Computer Virus By Perry Chiaramonte Published October 07, 2011 Fox News Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Airman 1st Class Caleb Force assists 1st Lt. Jorden Smith, a MQ-1B Predator pilot, in locating simulated targets during a training mission conducted inside the simulators at Creech Air Force Base, Nev.

fleet of U.S. military drones on a Nevada Air Force base has been infected by a keylogger virus that tracks every key and button their pilots press, Wired.com reported Friday -- and top Air Force sources strongly contested.

It logged every keystroke of the pilots in the control room on the base as they remotely flew Predator and Reaper drones on missions over Afghanistan and other battle zones.

There has been no confirmation of information being lost or sent to an outside source, but the virus has been resistant to military efforts to clear it from the system.

But the existence of ordinary-seeming computer viruses on what should be the most extraordinarily secure of military systems is far from shocking, said Anup Ghosh, a former scientist with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and chief scientist with security company Invincea.

senior Air Force source with knowledge of the drone program and familiar with the virus that was caught in recent weeks told FoxNews.com that Wired's story is 'blown out of proportion' and 'vastly overwritten.'

Computer virus infects US military drone fleet report

Computer virus infects US military drone fleet: report A computer virus has reportedly infected the US military drone fleet, Wired.com reported, citing three sources familiar with the matter....

Uav technology of Pakistan armed forces

HI! this is Polk defence info today we talk about uav technology of Pakistan, Pakistan use many types of uav since 2009 Pakistan use this technology in all counter insurgency operations The...

Computer virus found in military computers

A computer virus has infected the computers used to control the drones used to bombs Afghanistan. Elaine Quijano reports.

Hackers Claim Taking Over Drone After Breaching NASA

After protest from several hackers, the group says it decided to carry out a man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attack several months later that replaced the drone route file with one of their own in...

CYBERWAR GONE HOT? USAF INVESTIGATES OUTAGE of SECRET COMPUTER NETWORK at it MAJOR DRONE BASE.

CYBERWAR GONE HOT? AIR FORCE INVESTIGATES OUTAGE OF SECRET COMPUTER NETWORK AT ITS MAJOR DRONE BASE. In its report, BuzzFeed also pointed out that on the day SIPRNet crashed at Creech AFB,...

Zombie Attack Caught on Night Vision Camera by Russian Military

Zombie, Zombies, Man Eaten Alive.

Pentagon Launches 'Hack the Air Force' Bug Bounty Program

The U.S. Air Force is inviting hackers to find vulnerabilities in the Air Force's computer systems—and pays cash prizes to those who succeed.

ISIS uses drones to attack U.S. troops in Syria

Contact inquiries@nextanimation.com to license this or any News Direct video For story suggestions please contact tips@nextanimation.com.tw RESTRICTIONS: NONE Islamic State has reportedly...

DHS Drops New Warning On "Weaponized Drones"

In what appears to be an expertly timed exercise in fearmongering less than two weeks after the horrifying Halloween terror attack in lower Manhattan - the deadliest attack in America's financial...

Officials open up about drones

A top official takes us inside the White House debate on when to use drones. CNN's Chris Lawrence reports.