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EU proposes rules for artificial intelligence to limit risks

The European Union has unveiled proposals to regulate artificial intelligence that call for strict rules and safeguards on risky applications of the rapidly developing technology.

Ursula von der Leyen (@vonderleyen) February 19, 2020 European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen had ordered her top deputies to come up with a co-ordinated European approach to artificial intelligence and data strategy 100 days after she took office in December.

EU leaders, keen on establishing “technological sovereignty”, also released a strategy to unlock data from the continent’s businesses and the public sector so it can be harnessed for further innovation in artificial intelligence.

Officials in Europe, which does not have any homegrown tech giants, hope to catch up with the US and China by using the bloc’s vast and growing trove of industrial data for what they anticipate is a coming wave of digital transformation.

They also warned that even more regulation for foreign tech companies is in store with the upcoming Digital Services Act, a sweeping overhaul of how the bloc treats digital companies, including potentially holding them liable for illegal content posted on their platforms.

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Under the proposals, which are open for public consultation until May 19, EU authorities want to be able to test and certify the data used by the algorithms that power artificial intelligence in the same way they check cosmetics, cars and toys.

EU leaders said they also wanted to open a debate on when to allow facial recognition in remote identification systems, which are used to scan crowds to check people’s faces against those on a database.

EU proposes rules for artificial intelligence to limit risks | WBAL NewsRadio 1090/FM 101.5

LONDON (AP) — The European Union unveiled proposals Wednesday to regulate artificial intelligence that call for strict rules and safeguards on risky applications of the rapidly developing technology.

EU leaders, keen on establishing “technological sovereignty,' also released a strategy to unlock data from the continent's businesses and the public sector so it can be harnessed for further innovation in artificial intelligence.

Officials in Europe, which doesn't have any homegrown tech giants, hope to to catch up with the U.S. and China by using the bloc's vast and growing trove of industrial data for what they anticipate is a coming wave of digital transformation.

They also warned that even more regulation for foreign tech companies is in store with the upcoming “Digital Services Act,” a sweeping overhaul of how the bloc treats digital companies, including potentially holding them liable for illegal content posted on their platforms.

The EU's report said clear rules are needed to address “high-risk AI systems,” such as those in recruitment, healthcare, law enforcement or transport, which should be “transparent, traceable and guarantee human oversight.” Other artificial intelligence systems could come with labels certifying that they are in line with EU standards.

Under the proposals, which are open for public consultation until May 19, EU authorities want to be able to test and certify the data used by the algorithms that power artificial intelligence in the same way they check cosmetics, cars and toys.

EU leaders said they also wanted to open a debate on when to allow facial recognition in remote identification systems, which are used to scan crowds to check people's faces to those on a database.

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