AI News, EEG + AI assists drivers in manual and autonomous cars

EEG + AI assists drivers in manual and autonomous cars

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Nissan's 'B2V' system lets you drive a car with brain waves

Driverless cars may be our future, but that doesn't mean automakers have turned their backs on flesh-and-blood motorists.

Now Nissan has come up with a technology designed to make driving more fun for the folks behind the wheel: a 'brain decoding' system that gives automobiles the ability to anticipate a driver's action — hit the brakes or gas or make a turn — and then initiate the action before he or she does.

'When most people think about autonomous driving, they have a very impersonal vision of the future, where humans relinquish control to the machines,' Daniele Schillaci, an executive vice president at Nissan, said in the statement, adding that 'B2V technology does the opposite.'

Sayer questioned what the system would do if a driver chose to do something unsafe or ill-advised — for example, tapping the bumper of a car ahead to register displeasure at having been cut off.

Nissan’s ‘Brain-to-Vehicle’ interface will let cars of the future predict driver actions

The company’s ‘Brain-to-Vehicle’ (B2V) technology is the result of research into using brain decoding interfaces to predict a driver’s actions and detect discomfort.

Nissan started trialling its driverless technology in London last year.  “Through Nissan Intelligent Mobility, we are moving people to a better world by delivering more autonomy, more electrification and more connectivity.” The system allows cars to predict a driver’s behaviour by catching signs that their brain is about to initiate a movement – such as turning the steering wheel or pushing the accelerator pedal.

By anticipating intended movement, the systems can take actions - such as turning the steering wheel or slowing the car - 0.2 to 0.5 seconds faster than the driver, while remaining largely imperceptible.

This Is Your Brain On Electrodes: Nissan’s ‘B2V’ Driver-Skill Amplifier

The idea is to help the car anticipate the driver’s intentions a few fractions of a second before the driver would actually initiate a turn, change lanes, or step on the brakes.

It’s part of the broader Nissan Intelligent Mobility project that includes self-driving, assisted driving, and driver assists such as blind spot detection or adaptive cruise control.

Gheorghe says the system catches signs that the driver’s brain is about to, say, press the throttle, step on the brakes, or turn the steering wheel.

But if the driver intends to slow down, the car could ease off on the throttle to settle the suspension, or pre-charge the brakes or move the brake pads closer to the brake rotors.

If the car has haptic feedback, it could vibrate the seat or steering wheel before the driver starts the lane change to warn of a car in the way.

Depending on the driver, Nissan’s B2V sensors and analytics can predict the driver’s next action 0.2 to 0.5 seconds ahead of when the driver begins the action.

Nissan studies Brain-to-Vehicle Driving

Nissan has unveiled research that will enable vehicles to interpret signals from the driver’s brain, redefining how people interact with their cars.

This breakthrough from Nissan is the result of research into using brain decoding technology to predict a driver’s actions and detect discomfort: Predict: By catching signs that the driver’s brain is about to initiate a movement – such as turning the steering wheel or pushing the accelerator pedal – driver assist technologies can begin the action more quickly.

By anticipating intended movement, the systems can take actions – such as turning the steering wheel or slowing the car – 0.2 to 0.5 seconds faster than the driver, while remaining largely imperceptible.