AI News, BOOK REVIEW: Difference between revisions of "School:Computer Science/Intro"

Difference between revisions of "School:Computer Science/Intro"

Computer science or computing science (CS) is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation.

Computer scientists invent algorithmic processes that create, describe, and transform information and formulate suitable abstractions to design and model complex systems.

There is no diploma or official recognition - this is simply an opportunity to follow a similar learning path to a traditional college Computer Science program.

School:Computer Science

Computer science or computing science (CS) is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation.

Computer scientists invent algorithmic processes that create, describe, and transform information and formulate suitable abstractions to design and model complex systems.

There is no diploma or official recognition - this is simply an opportunity to follow a similar learning path to a traditional college Computer Science program.

Applied mathematics

Applied mathematics is the application of mathematical methods by different fields such as science, engineering, business, computer science, and industry.

In the past, practical applications have motivated the development of mathematical theories, which then became the subject of study in pure mathematics where abstract concepts are studied for their own sake.

This history left a pedagogical legacy in the United States: until the early 20th century, subjects such as classical mechanics were often taught in applied mathematics departments at American universities rather than in physics departments, and fluid mechanics may still be taught in applied mathematics departments.[1]

Even fields such as number theory that are part of pure mathematics are now important in applications (such as cryptography), though they are not generally considered to be part of the field of applied mathematics per se.

Sometimes, the term 'applicable mathematics' is used to distinguish between the traditional applied mathematics that developed alongside physics and the many areas of mathematics that are applicable to real-world problems today.

The success of modern numerical mathematical methods and software has led to the emergence of computational mathematics, computational science, and computational engineering, which use high-performance computing for the simulation of phenomena and the solution of problems in the sciences and engineering.

However, since World War II, fields outside the physical sciences have spawned the creation of new areas of mathematics, such as game theory and social choice theory, which grew out of economic considerations.

The advent of the computer has enabled new applications: studying and using the new computer technology itself (computer science) to study problems arising in other areas of science (computational science) as well as the mathematics of computation (for example, theoretical computer science, computer algebra, numerical analysis).

Scientific computing includes applied mathematics (especially numerical analysis), computing science (especially high-performance computing), and mathematical modelling in a scientific discipline.

Sometimes the term 'applicable mathematics' is used to distinguish between the traditional applied mathematics that developed alongside physics and the many areas of mathematics that are applicable to real-world problems today.

Some mathematicians emphasize the term applicable mathematics to separate or delineate the traditional applied areas from new applications arising from fields that were previously seen as pure mathematics.[9]

Even fields such as number theory that are part of pure mathematics are now important in applications (such as cryptography), though they are not generally considered to be part of the field of applied mathematics per se.

Many universities teach mathematical and statistical courses outside the respective departments, in departments and areas including business, engineering, physics, chemistry, psychology, biology, computer science, scientific computation, and mathematical physics.

Computer Science

all students apply for a four-year course, and then decide at the start of the third year whether they wish to continue to the fourth year (which is subject to achieving a 2:1 at the end of the third year).

We are looking for students with a real flair for mathematics, which you will develop into skills that can be used both for reasoning rigorously about the behaviour of programs and computer systems, and for applications such as scientific computing.

Common roles for graduates include computer programmer, software designer and engineer, financial analyst and scientific researcher.  Graduates in Computer Science from Oxford were the top earners in the 2017 Sunday Times league table of graduate salaries.

In years three and four about a third of your time is spent working on your chosen individual project. There may be up to 100 students attending any given lecture.  Most tutorials, classes, and lectures are delivered by staff who are tutors in their subject.

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