AI News, Deepfakes: it's all in the blink of an eye artificial intelligence

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In 1976 in a warehouse in Texas, Jimmie Loocke bought two tons of scrapped NASA equipment.

Years later he realized it included a computer from an Apollo lunar module, like the one used to guide the lander to the surface of the moon during Apollo 11.

Fake news is real – A.I. is going to make it much worse

“The Boy Who Cried Wolf” has long been a staple on nursery room shelves for a reason: It teaches kids that joking too much about a possible threat may turn people ignorant when the threat becomes an actual danger.

The threat is called “deepfaking,” a product of AI and machine learning advancements that allows high-tech computers to produce completely false yet remarkably realistic videos depicting events that never happened or people saying things they never said.

Deepfake technology is allowing organizations that produce fake news to augment their “reporting” with seemingly legitimate videos, blurring the line between reality and fiction like never before – and placing the reputation of journalists and the media at greater risk.

“If you asked me this question six months ago, I would’ve said, ‘Yeah, (the technology) is super cool, but there’s a lot of artifacts, and if you’re paying attention, you can probably tell that there’s something wrong,’” Farid said.

quickly but surely getting to the point where the average person is going to have trouble distinguishing.” In fact, Zhao said researchers believe the shortcomings that make deepfake videos look slightly off to the eye can readily be fixed with better technology and better hardware.

“It’s the injection of that technology into an existing environment of mistrust, misinformation, social media, a highly polarized electorate, and now I think there’s a real sort of amplification factor because when you hear people say things, it raises the level of belief to a whole new level.” The prospect of widespread availability of this technology is raising eyebrows, too.

And I think that’s sort of the world we’re entering into when we can’t believe anything that we see.” Thinking about retirement?: Answer these 3 questions first Electric bills can be a pain: Here's where you'll pay the most for them Zhao has spent a great deal of time speaking with prosecutors, judges – the legal profession is another sector where the implications are huge – reporters and other professors to get a sense for every nuance of the issue.

Farid said companies like photo and video verification platform Truepic, to which he serves as an adviser, are using the blockchain to create and store digital signatures for authentically shot videos as they are being recorded, which makes them much easier to verify later.

So I think in the end our goal is not to eliminate these things, but it’s to manage the threat.” Until this happens, Zhao said the fight against genuinely fake news may not start on a ledger, but in stronger consumer awareness and journalists banding together to better verify sources through third parties.

“There has to be that level of scrutiny by the consumer for us to have any chance of fighting back against this type of fake content.” Nicholas Diakopoulos, assistant professor in Northwestern University’s School of Communication and expert on the future of journalism, said via email that the best solutions involve a mix of educational and sociotechnical advances.

“Rapid response teams of journalists should be trained and ready to use these tools during the 2020 elections so they can debunk disinformation as quickly as possible.” 'We need change': Amazon workers are planning a labor strike on Prime Day The best country to be a woman?: It's not the US Diakopoulos has studied the implications of deepfakes for the 2020 elections specifically.

In an era when we can’t believe our eyes when we see something online, news organizations that are properly prepared, equipped and staffed are poised to become even more trusted sources of information.” ©CNBC is a USA TODAY content partner offering financial news and commentary.

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has long been a staple on nursery room shelves for a reason: It teaches kids that joking too much about a possible threat may turn people ignorant when the threat becomes an actual danger.

a product of AI and machine learning advancements that allows high-tech computers to produce completely false yet remarkably realistic videos depicting events that never happened or people saying things they never said.

Earlier this year a clip purporting to show Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi slurring her words when speaking to the press was shared widely on social media, including at one point by Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani.

Even with the real video now widely accessible, Hany Farid, a professor at UC Berkeley's School of Information and a digital forensics expert, said he still regularly receives emails from people insisting the slowed video is the legitimate one.

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