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We continue to engage with developers to help us in making driving in London better, with innovative solutions to traffic, road disruption and planned works information through apps created from our open data. As part of our engagement with the developer community we held an Urban Traffic Data Hackathon on 14-15 November.

Supported by our Roads Space Management team, the event was planned in order to give us the opportunity to engage directly with developers to work on creative and innovative solutions to the challenges on London’s roads. In putting the Hackathon together, we worked with Data Science London (DSL), the largest data science community in Europe, and arranged for data scientists and innovators who are members of DSL to take part in the event.

The run up to the event included a pre briefing session with 380 attendees to share our aims and information about the data sets we were making available. The data sets were received with great interest by the group, and the numbers wishing to attend the weekend were so high they had to be limited to the venue capacity.

This continues to open up new ways to explore solutions to London’s challenges. If you attended the Hackathon and have any comments or feedback on the event itself, or if you have any other questions or comments on TfL’s open data and unified API in general, we’d love to hear from you – let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

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Events include a data art exhibition, a demo of a new platform to identify risk to affordable housing in Brooklyn, a tour of a data exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, workshops for student entrepreneurs on how to use open data to build their business, and more.

The City’s Open Data Portal, visited 75,000 times each month on average, allows New Yorkers to access nearly 2,000 free municipal datasets, ranging from 311 complaints to crime incidents by neighborhood to the location of every street tree in the city.“A fair city is an open city.

“Open Data Week is about highlighting those stories and giving all New Yorkers inspiration to make a difference.”“The NYC Open Data Portal is a powerful tool that ensures transparency and fosters civic innovation within our City to help improve the quality of life for all New Yorkers,” said Samir Saini, Commissioner of the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications.“While New York City has impressive open data stats to boast: nearly 2,000 published data assets and 20,000 visitors to the site per week on average - much of its value happens behind the scenes in making our government more data-driven,” said Emily W.

Open Data is transforming the way our City thinks about data-sharing and the power of analytics to drive change for New Yorkers.”“Since committing to Open Data for All in 2015, we have dismissed the idea ‘If you build it they will come’ and taken efforts to engage more New Yorkers than ever in the data created by their City,” said Adrienne Schmoeker, Director of Civic Engagement

“We are thrilled to celebrate Open Data Week with all our partners who make transparent government possible.”Highlights of Open Data Week include:Brooklyn (March 2-10): Data Through Design: Art Exhibit at the Made in NY Media Center is a free exhibit in DUMBO, Brooklyn featuring eight artists selected in February 2018 exploring the insights and stories that emerge from public data.

Brooklyn (Thursday, March 8): Identify Affordable Housing Risks with Data at Brooklyn Borough Hall will unveil a new web portal to host housing data from multiple sources, allowing organizations to share, validate, and bolster their findings and research to show trends and threats to affordable housing in Brooklyn.

The City is also offering a chance for New Yorkers and international users to enter their own projects into the running for the following awards, which will be judged by a panel of experts from the City, WNYC, SAVI at the Pratt Institute, NYC Tech Alliance, and Technical.ly Brooklyn:Mayor’s Civics AwardData Science AwardOpen Data AwardMost Creative AwardNYC Innovator AwardThe contest officially launches on March 3 and runs through May 1, see the Open Data Website for more details: nyc.gov/opendata.“Data was born to be free, and NYC’s Open Data program ensures it lives that way” said Miguel Gamiño, Jr., New York City Chief Technology Officer.

“Democratization of data makes it possible for any entrepreneur and startup to access one of the most valuable ingredients for building technologies that serve the public and make technology work for all people.”“TLC is proud to celebrate Open Data Week and the sixth anniversary of the City’s Open Data Law!” said TLC Commissioner Meera Joshi.

“Since the law passed in 2012, there has been massive growth in the for-hire industries in NYC, and TLC has expanded data reporting requirements to understand the effects of this growth and to better regulate services, making much of this granular trip data available to the public.

TLC goes beyond the law’s requirements and has identified new metrics that are most useful for the public in understanding how taxis, app-based services, and traditional for-hire services operate in NYC, allowing the public to see firsthand the growth and its effects, no matter a person’s technical skills with data.”“With NYC Open Data Week, the City has created a unique opportunity for New Yorkers to step into the world of data,” said Gregg Bishop, Commissioner of the New York City Department of Small Business Services.

“Not only is the City opening up data for all but, given the upward mobility that data careers offer, we’re providing free skills training and job connection to open up opportunity for New Yorkers in an increasingly tech-driven economy.”“NYC Service is thrilled to engage our Youth Leadership Councils in Open Data Week,” said NYC Chief Service Officer Paula Gavin.

“Community data is a foundation for civic engagement and the Open Data platform is an important tool that encourages our City’s youth to better understand their neighborhoods in new ways, allowing them access to information that can be used to improve policy and practice in all five boroughs.”“Our Open Data Law has given rise to a dazzling constellation of new apps, research projects, and even businesses aimed at improving New Yorkers’ lives through the creative use of public datasets,” said Manhattan Borough President Gale A.

“Happy Open Data Week to all the civic hackers out there building things with public data, and thank you to the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, DoITT, DoRIS, and the public servants at every city agency working to put government data to work for the people we serve.”“I believe nearly every sector of our municipal government would be enhanced by a better utilization and activation of civic data, through real-time monitoring, enhanced public accountability, and dynamic agency response.

Today, accessible data is being used by everyone from students to professionals in an effort to influence policy and change in their communities, so it is with great excitement that we ask for this year’s participants to step up their game, and take full advantage of this tremendous opportunity to create new innovations with NYC’s data, and to create a better city for everyone.”“New York City’s Open Data policy puts us at the forefront of giving residents the information they need to make a difference,” said Council Member Ben Kallos.

They are the organizers of two Open Data Week events, School of Data and Unlocking Open Data for Community Boards with the Manhattan Borough President’s Office.“After 6 years and 7 additional laws, New York City has nearly 2,000 public data assets from more than 50 different municipal publishers - truly the world’s greatest open data program.

We hope to see all of you at NYC’s community data conference.”“Once again New York is leading the tech industry by demonstrating that open data serves the public interest and spurs innovation in both government and private endeavors,” said Andrew Rasiej, Chairman of the NY Tech Alliance and CEO of Civic Hall.

“Now Six Years after New York City’s landmark open data law was passed Open Data Week confirms that both government and citizens are using information that makes government more effective and accountable to the citizens it serves.”“Allowing New York’s innovators access to the wealth of data collected by NYC agencies creates opportunities for startups, large companies, and technologists everywhere.

It gives our entrepreneurs the chance to not only solve public-facing problems, but also the tools to build businesses that matter,” said Julie Samuels, Executive Director, Tech:NYC.“Six years ago, New York City put a plan in motion to leverage its data as a strategic asset.

New York City has created an ecosystem that fosters startups and economic activity around the city, makes the city government more accountable, supports a vibrant civic community, and improves the daily digital experience of New Yorkers.

The Future City Lab, part of our signature New York at Its Core exhibition and home to the world’s largest visual display of data about the city, is made possible only by New York City’s commitment to open data and embodies the idea that meeting the challenges of the future requires access to information in the present.

“Choosing where to live is one of the biggest decisions a person makes, and we’re proud that Rentlogic has brought transparency to a difficult process in a simple, user-friendly platform for the public good.”“At Forum for the Future, we design open and collaborative strategies for a more sustainable world, and being part of New York City Open Data Week amplifies our ability to do this.

As part of our commitment to using innovation for civic and social benefit, we consider NYC Open Data an invaluable resource and fuel for innovation to improve the lives of our neighbors, communities and local businesses.

Events include a data art exhibition, a demo of a new platform to identify risk to affordable housing in Brooklyn, a tour of a data exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, workshops for student entrepreneurs on how to use open data to build their business, and more.

The City’s Open Data Portal, visited 75,000 times each month on average, allows New Yorkers to access nearly 2,000 free municipal datasets, ranging from 311 complaints to crime incidents by neighborhood to the location of every street tree in the city.

“While New York City has impressive open data stats to boast: nearly 2,000 published data assets and 20,000 visitors to the site per week on average - much of its value happens behind the scenes in making our government more data-driven,” said Emily W.

The City is also offering a chance for New Yorkers and international users to enter their own projects into the running for the following awards, which will be judged by a panel of experts from the City, WNYC, SAVI at the Pratt Institute, NYC Tech Alliance, and Technical.ly Brooklyn: The contest officially launches on March 3 and runs through May 1, see the Open Data Website for more details: nyc.gov/opendata.

“Since the law passed in 2012, there has been massive growth in the for-hire industries in NYC, and TLC has expanded data reporting requirements to understand the effects of this growth and to better regulate services, making much of this granular trip data available to the public.

TLC goes beyond the law’s requirements and has identified new metrics that are most useful for the public in understanding how taxis, app-based services, and traditional for-hire services operate in NYC, allowing the public to see firsthand the growth and its effects, no matter a person’s technical skills with data.”

“Not only is the City opening up data for all but, given the upward mobility that data careers offer, we’re providing free skills training and job connection to open up opportunity for New Yorkers in an increasingly tech-driven economy.”

“Community data is a foundation for civic engagement and the Open Data platform is an important tool that encourages our City’s youth to better understand their neighborhoods in new ways, allowing them access to information that can be used to improve policy and practice in all five boroughs.”

“I believe nearly every sector of our municipal government would be enhanced by a better utilization and activation of civic data, through real-time monitoring, enhanced public accountability, and dynamic agency response.

Today, accessible data is being used by everyone from students to professionals in an effort to influence policy and change in their communities, so it is with great excitement that we ask for this year’s participants to step up their game, and take full advantage of this tremendous opportunity to create new innovations with NYC’s data, and to create a better city for everyone.”

“After 6 years and 7 additional laws, New York City has nearly 2,000 public data assets from more than 50 different municipal publishers - truly the world’s greatest open data program.

New York City has created an ecosystem that fosters startups and economic activity around the city, makes the city government more accountable, supports a vibrant civic community, and improves the daily digital experience of New Yorkers.

The Future City Lab, part of our signature New York at Its Core exhibition and home to the world’s largest visual display of data about the city, is made possible only by New York City’s commitment to open data and embodies the idea that meeting the challenges of the future requires access to information in the present.

As part of our commitment to using innovation for civic and social benefit, we consider NYC Open Data an invaluable resource and fuel for innovation to improve the lives of our neighbors, communities and local businesses.

Road bicycle racing

Road bicycle racing is the cycle sport discipline of road cycling, held on paved roads.

They provided a template for other races around the world.[citation needed] Cycling has been part of the Summer Olympic Games since the modern sequence started in Athens in 1896.[2] Historically, the most competitive and devoted countries since the beginning of 20th century were Belgium, France and Italy, then road cycling spread in Colombia, Denmark, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland after World War II.

Unlike individual time trials where competitors are not permitted to 'draft' (ride in the slipstream) behind each other, in team time trials, riders in each team employ this as their main tactic, each member taking a turn at the front while teammates 'sit in' behind.

Race distances vary from a few km (typically a prologue, an individual time trial of usually less than 5 miles (8.0 km) before a stage race, used to determine which rider wears the leader's jersey on the first stage) to between approximately 20 miles (32 km) and 60 miles (97 km).

The professional road bicycle racing calendar includes three Grand Tours - the Giro d'Italia, the Tour de France, and the Vuelta a Espana.[3] Ultra-distance cycling races are very long single stage events where the race clock continuously runs from start to finish.

Riding in the main field, or peloton, can save as much as 40% of the energy employed in forward motion when compared to riding alone.[4] Some teams designate a leader, whom the rest of the team is charged with keeping out of the wind and in good position until a critical section of the race.

riders can cooperate and draft each other to ride at high speed (a paceline or echelon), or one rider can sit on a competitor's wheel, forcing him to do a greater share of the work in maintaining the pace and to potentially tire earlier.

Working together smoothly and efficiently, a small group can potentially maintain a higher speed than the peloton, in which the remaining riders may not be as motivated or organized to chase effectively.[5] Usually a rider or group of riders will try to break from the peloton by attacking and riding ahead to reduce the number of contenders for the win.

If the break does not succeed and the body of cyclists comes back together, a sprinter will often win by overpowering competitors in the final stretch.[6] Teamwork between riders, both pre-arranged and ad-hoc, is important in many aspects: in preventing or helping a successful break, and sometimes in delivering a sprinter to the front of the field.[7] To make the course more selective, races often feature difficult sections such as tough climbs, fast descents, and sometimes technical surfaces (such as the cobbled pavé used in the Paris–Roubaix race).

Cyclists have been finding that three- or four-spoked composite front wheels are more stable when confronting crosswinds.[8] Crosswinds, particularly, alter the position of the 'shadow' when drafting a rider, usually placing it diagonally behind the lead rider.[9] To take advantage of this, an attacking rider rides at high speed at the front of the peloton, on the opposite side of the road from which the crosswind is blowing.

If such tactics are maintained for long enough, a weaker rider somewhere in the line will be unable to keep contact with the rider directly ahead, causing the peloton to split up.[10] As well as exceptional fitness, successful riders must develop excellent bike handling skills in order to ride at high speeds in close quarters with other riders.

In professional stage racing, particularly the Tour de France, riders who are not in a position to win the race or assist a teammate, will usually attempt to ride to the finish within a specified percentage of the winner's finishing time, to be permitted to start the next day's stage.

The influence of radios on race tactics is a topic of discussion amongst the cycling community, with some arguing that the introduction of radios in the 1990s has devalued the tactical knowledge of individual riders and has led to less exciting racing.[12] In September 2009, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), the governing body of pro cycling, voted to phase in a ban on the use of team radios in men's elite road racing.[13] However, after protests from teams, the ban introduced in 2011 excluded races on the top-level men's and women's circuits (the UCI World Tour and UCI Women's Road World Cup) and in 2015 the UCI reversed its stance, allowing race radios to be used in class HC and class 1 events from the 2016 season.[14] Within the discipline of road racing, from young age different cyclists have different (relative) strengths and weaknesses.[15] Depending on these, riders tend to prefer different events over particular courses, and perform different tactical roles within a team.

The general leader typically wears a distinctive jersey (yellow in the Tour de France) and generally maintains a position near the head of the main mass of riders (the peloton), surrounded by team members, whose job it is to protect the leader.

Such escapes usually achieve other goals, such as winning the stage, collecting sprinting or mountain points, or just creating air time for their team sponsors as a dedicated camera bike typically accompanies the escape.

The Bicycle Union [of Britain], having quarrelled with the Amateur Athletic Association over cycle race jurisdiction on AAA premises, took issue with the Union Vélocipèdique de France over the French body's willingness to allows its 'amateurs' to compete for prizes of up to 2,000 francs, the equivalent of about sixteen months' pay for a French manual worker.[1] The first international body was the International Cycling Association (ICA), established by an English schoolteacher named Henry Sturmey, the founder of Sturmey-Archer.

In Australia, due to the relatively mild winters and hot summers, the amateur road racing season runs from autumn to spring, through the winter months, while criterium races are held in the mornings or late afternoons during the summer.

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