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Preparing for Artificial Intelligence in the Legal Profession

This article reviews the basics of AI, key use cases for AI in the legal profession, some primary AI-related legal issues, and steps that your law firm or in-house legal department may want to take to become AI-ready.

AI 101 for Lawyers In his book “The Fourth Industrial Revolution,”3 Klaus Schwab, executive chairman and founder of The World Economic Forum, begins by briefly reviewing the three earlier industrial revolutions that transformed our society and then devotes the remainder of the book to describing how our world recently entered a whole new era in which we will witness unprecedented major and rapid technological innovations.

Others define AI as a system capable of rationally solving complex problems or taking appropriate actions to achieve its goals in whatever real world circumstances it encounters.”

Use Cases for AI in the Legal Profession There are a number of potential applications for the utilization of AI systems in the legal industry—especially as they relate to the automation of repetitive and routine tasks to help lawyers provide superior legal counsel at a higher level.

AI systems may be able to aid lawyers by performing legal research on relevant case law and applicable statutes in a faster and more thorough manner than what lawyers may be able to do on their own.

While the person who asked the question chuckled at me, the reality is that lawyers will increasingly be able to rely upon AI-powered digital assistants that become smarter as they learn more about you to perform the various necessary administrative functions that are part of any legal practice.

In addition, lawyers specializing in contract negotiation matters would appreciate an AI system that could provide a fast and thorough contract comparison whenever there is a battle of the forms between contracting parties regarding which standard contract terms should be utilized.

An additional welcome step would be for an AI system to suggest suitable fallbacks or alternative contract provisions from a contracting party’s repository of negotiated contracts to help address a particular contractual issue.

Performing Due Diligence All lawyers know that conducting a comprehensive due diligence review in connection with the huge amounts of data that are part of any merger, acquisition, or other sophisticated corporate transaction is absolutely necessary.

sophisticated AI system with the capability to actively identify and analyze data patterns regarding internal company matters and employee activities may be helpful to an organization’s compliance department.

For instance, AI systems could be utilized by law firms—which are increasingly being targeted by cybercriminals—to monitor and assess the data involving attempts to penetrate their information technology infrastructure so they can proactively identify trends and patterns and close security gaps to attain more robust cybersecurity.

As an example, the Microsoft legal department uses the e-Discovery features of the Microsoft Office 365 cloud computing solution to improve the accuracy and usefulness of discovery results and save time and money—$4.5 million annually.

Enhanced Self-Help Legal Resources Law firms, in-house legal departments, and non-profit legal aid organizations are increasingly providing legal self-help resources directly to their clients via web portals as a form of de-lawyering.

Since the AI world does serve to increase the surface area for potential targets for cybercriminals and because data privacy laws continue to evolve—for instance the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation takes effect in May 2018—consumers of AI-related services should carefully evaluate AI providers and clearly understand what specific steps they take to appropriately safeguard data.

Law Enforcement Access to Data Because the amount of data continues to grow and our laws have not been updated to keep pace with the change in the technology landscape, during the past few years we have seen various legal challenges between technology companies and the U.S. government pertaining to law enforcement access to data.

As AI systems are increasingly used by lawyers, it will be interesting to see whether the ABA Model Rules will evolve to specifically address AI use by lawyers and if state legal ethics associations will issue ethics opinions on AI—just like they have done for cloud computing.

Since AI is currently such a top of mind subject, be sure to collaborate with fellow lawyers at law firms, in-house legal departments, and non-profit legal organizations to understand how they plan on deploying AI in their delivery of legal support.

While there is no doubt that there will be some growing pains associated with AI, lawyers should not fear AI, as the potential long-term benefits in leveraging AI to help automate aspects of their legal services far outweigh the potential risks.

Although some are of the mindset that AI may serve to replace lawyers and other legal professionals, I believe Al will result in a redeployment of legal resources and free up time for lawyers to perform more mission-critical work for their clients.

While AI may offer lawyers leading technology and data-driven tools to provide efficient, quick, and impactful legal counsel to clients, AI is still not a substitute for a lawyer’s own empathy, judgment, instinct, and personal relationship with clients.

This article reviews the basics of AI, key use cases for AI in the legal profession, some primary AI-related legal issues, and steps that your law firm or in-house legal department may want to take to become AI-ready.

In his book “The Fourth Industrial Revolution,”3 Klaus Schwab, executive chairman and founder of The World Economic Forum, begins by briefly reviewing the three earlier industrial revolutions that transformed our society and then devotes the remainder of the book to describing how our world recently entered a whole new era in which we will witness unprecedented major and rapid technological innovations.

There are a number of potential applications for the utilization of AI systems in the legal industry—especially as they relate to the automation of repetitive and routine tasks to help lawyers provide superior legal counsel at a higher level.

While the person who asked the question chuckled at me, the reality is that lawyers will increasingly be able to rely upon AI-powered digital assistants that become smarter as they learn more about you to perform the various necessary administrative functions that are part of any legal practice.

In addition, lawyers specializing in contract negotiation matters would appreciate an AI system that could provide a fast and thorough contract comparison whenever there is a battle of the forms between contracting parties regarding which standard contract terms should be utilized.

An additional welcome step would be for an AI system to suggest suitable fallbacks or alternative contract provisions from a contracting party’s repository of negotiated contracts to help address a particular contractual issue.

Performing Due Diligence All lawyers know that conducting a comprehensive due diligence review in connection with the huge amounts of data that are part of any merger, acquisition, or other sophisticated corporate transaction is absolutely necessary.

sophisticated AI system with the capability to actively identify and analyze data patterns regarding internal company matters and employee activities may be helpful to an organization’s compliance department.

For instance, AI systems could be utilized by law firms—which are increasingly being targeted by cybercriminals—to monitor and assess the data involving attempts to penetrate their information technology infrastructure so they can proactively identify trends and patterns and close security gaps to attain more robust cybersecurity.

As an example, the Microsoft legal department uses the e-Discovery features of the Microsoft Office 365 cloud computing solution to improve the accuracy and usefulness of discovery results and save time and money—$4.5 million annually.

Enhanced Self-Help Legal Resources Law firms, in-house legal departments, and non-profit legal aid organizations are increasingly providing legal self-help resources directly to their clients via web portals as a form of de-lawyering.

Since the AI world does serve to increase the surface area for potential targets for cybercriminals and because data privacy laws continue to evolve—for instance the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation takes effect in May 2018—consumers of AI-related services should carefully evaluate AI providers and clearly understand what specific steps they take to appropriately safeguard data.

Law Enforcement Access to Data Because the amount of data continues to grow and our laws have not been updated to keep pace with the change in the technology landscape, during the past few years we have seen various legal challenges between technology companies and the U.S. government pertaining to law enforcement access to data.

As AI systems are increasingly used by lawyers, it will be interesting to see whether the ABA Model Rules will evolve to specifically address AI use by lawyers and if state legal ethics associations will issue ethics opinions on AI—just like they have done for cloud computing.

Since AI is currently such a top of mind subject, be sure to collaborate with fellow lawyers at law firms, in-house legal departments, and non-profit legal organizations to understand how they plan on deploying AI in their delivery of legal support.

While there is no doubt that there will be some growing pains associated with AI, lawyers should not fear AI, as the potential long-term benefits in leveraging AI to help automate aspects of their legal services far outweigh the potential risks.

Although some are of the mindset that AI may serve to replace lawyers and other legal professionals, I believe Al will result in a redeployment of legal resources and free up time for lawyers to perform more mission-critical work for their clients.

While AI may offer lawyers leading technology and data-driven tools to provide efficient, quick, and impactful legal counsel to clients, AI is still not a substitute for a lawyer’s own empathy, judgment, instinct, and personal relationship with clients.

We risk a digital crisis in 2019 akin to the 2008 banking crisis, warns data privacy lawyer

The artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm predicted the verdicts to an accuracy of 79%, according to the scientists involved with the research project.

The scientists used the algorithm to analyse 584 cases related to three articles of the Convention on Human Rights: The algorithm looked to identify patterns in the text, labelling each case either as a “violation”

However, Dr Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL Computer Science said “We don’t see AI replacing judges or lawyers, but we think they’d find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes”.

Matt Jones, an analyst at data science consultancy Tessella, said of the research project: “It has huge potential as a big timesaver in legal cases by automating some of the less interesting tasks and helping people make decisions on chances of success.

>See also: Why law firms must overthrow legacy IT “An AI can make a good guess but without direct appreciation of the wider context outside of its training data and experience, that guess may be widely off the mark, and in a legal situation that may be dangerous for the case.”

Making a case for artificial intelligence in the legal profession

“It’s jobs where there is a human element like being a barrister or a journalist (now I feel bad for the lawyer joke) that will be less susceptible to computerisation.” While AI may not lead to a widespread loss of jobs in the legal profession, Holmes says that barristers will be adapting to the arrival of AI and automation: “Part of the reason that barristers will be adapting is to do with jobs involving a formula or sifting through documents, specifically in working with contracts and discovery (a pre-trial process where both sides look for relevant documents to build their case).

it’s like finding the needle in the haystack and will involve getting very junior lawyers to sift through documents at an hourly rate, which is lengthy, cumbersome and expensive.” JPMorgan, for example, announced last year that it is using software called Contract Intelligence, or COIN, that can dramatically reduce the amount of time it takes to review legal documents;

The subscription service uses Natural Language Processing (NLP) so that instead of trawling through several static databases for the right case law a lawyer can ask a specific question to ROSS like they would to a colleague, eg “Is there precedent for situation X?’ and receive a consolidated answer.

“EVA substantially increases the efficiency and accuracy of legal document analysis (think briefs, memoranda, motions, pleadings, etc), while also showcasing some of the work our engineers are now doing in semantic relationship analysis between words, as well as information synthesis,” says Arruda.

What this means is that the dialogue has moved away from alarmist conversations about ‘robot lawyers’, and into the realm of how lawyers can leverage this new wave of software in their day to day workflows.” Even so, times will change: “We are currently still in the adoption phase of narrow applications of artificial intelligence in the legal space.

In the future, lawyers will be able to play a very valuable advisory role for their clients, as the more simple and routine work can be both expedited and performed to a higher degree of accuracy using AI tools.” This future, of course, assumes that the kind of data these machine learning systems use is accessible in the first place and this is the hurdle that legal tech startup Vizlegal is working on, says chief executive Gavin Sheridan.

If there is no API you’re in trouble.” Sheridan says that if you are looking at improving the legal industry with AI you need to look at it from first principles: “At the very simplest level you have to get the information first, get it in the correct format and get it correctly structured before you can do all the nice sexy machine learning stuff.” A

We’re so used to thinking that Google indexes and makes searchable all online documents, but what about scanned sheets, non-useful or misspelled file names, no associated keywords, websites with tags asking search engines not to index them etc.

So while this brave new world of AI-assisted legal practices may well be only a little further down the line, Sheridan and Vizlegal are tending to what he likes to call “the plumbing and pipes of law”, laying the groundwork for the “sexy machine learning” part.

The Verdict Is In: AI Outperforms Human Lawyers in Reviewing Legal Documents

“The lawyers who reviewed these documents were fully focused on the task: it didn’t sink to the bottom of a to-do list, it didn’t get rushed through while waiting for a plane or with one eye on the clock to get out the door to pick up the kids.”

For example, researchers from the John Radcliffe Hospital and the startup Optellum are working on AI systems that can diagnose heart disease and lung cancer earlier and more accurately than human doctors.

Artificial Intelligence in the legal profession

Artificial Intelligence in the legal profession Artificial intelligence is a technology that's new to the legal world and a subject of controversy among some lawyers.

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