AI News, Classifying Handwritten Digits with TF.Learn - Machine Learning Recipes #7

Classifying Handwritten Digits with TF.Learn - Machine Learning Recipes #7

I have a couple alternate ways of introducing them that I think would be helpful (and I put some exceptional links below for you to check out to learn more, esp.

Finally, I’ll show you how to reproduce those nifty images of weights from TensorFlow.org's Basic MNIST’s tutorial.Jupyter Notebook: https://goo.gl/NNlMNuDocker images: https://goo.gl/8fmqVWMNIST tutorial: https://goo.gl/GQ3t7nVisualizing MNIST: http://goo.gl/ROcwpR (this blog is outstanding)More notebooks: https://goo.gl/GgLIh7More about linear classifiers: https://goo.gl/u2f2NEMuch more about linear classifiers: http://goo.gl/au1PdG (this course is outstanding, highly recommended)More TF.Learn examples: https://goo.gl/szki63Thanks for watching, and have fun!

Classifying Handwritten Digits with TF.Learn - Machine Learning Recipes #7

I have a couple alternate ways of introducing them that I think would be helpful (and I put some exceptional links below for you to check out to learn more, esp.

Finally, I’ll show you how to reproduce those nifty images of weights from TensorFlow.org's Basic MNIST’s tutorial.Jupyter Notebook: https://goo.gl/NNlMNuDocker images: https://goo.gl/8fmqVWMNIST tutorial: https://goo.gl/GQ3t7nVisualizing MNIST: http://goo.gl/ROcwpR (this blog is outstanding)More notebooks: https://goo.gl/GgLIh7More about linear classifiers: https://goo.gl/u2f2NEMuch more about linear classifiers: http://goo.gl/au1PdG (this course is outstanding, highly recommended)More TF.Learn examples: https://goo.gl/szki63Thanks for watching, and have fun!

Write This Down: Note-Taking Strategies for Academic Success

For most of your classes (especially lecture-heavy social science courses) I recommend taking notes with a laptop.

You can type faster than you can write, it makes organizing your notes easier, and your notes will always be in legible type instead of the chicken scratch you callhandwriting.

While you could just use your computer’s default text file editor or word processor program, I recommend using a programspecificallydesigned fornote-taking.

Just scan your handwritten notes into Evernote, and Evernote will use the magic of image recognition technology to allow you to search for your handwritten notes within the app.

It also lets you record your professor using your computer’s microphone (just make sure to ask your professor first if it’s okay to record him or her).

As you take notes during class, you’ll probably want to bold, underline, or italicize certain points and words.

italicize text: Control+I (Command+I on Mac), then type what you want italicized To create a bulleted list: Depends on the platform- To create a numbered list: Depends on the platform- To find text: Control+F (Command+F on Mac) This is handy whenever you’re reviewing notes and want to find instances where you wrote about a specific topic.

If you find yourself typing certain phrases or words over and over again, save yourself time by using a text expander program.

For example, when I was taking Torts during my first year of law school, instead of typing out “intentional infliction of emotional distress”

Here are some text expander programs for the various operating systems out there: PhraseExpress (Windows 7) Texter (All other versions of Windows) TextExpander (Mac) AutoKey (Linux) AutoHotKey (Windows/Mac/Linux) Pen and Paper To keep students from surfing around during class and force them to actually pay attention, some professors are starting to ban the use of laptops during their classes.

If you find yourself in one of these classes, you’ll need to use the note-taking tools your dad and grandpa used: good old fashioned pen and paper.

Even if your professor doesn’t ban laptops, there are some classes where it’s actually better to take notes by hand.

Classes that are heavy on numbers, equations, and formulas–calculus, chemistry, physics, economics, symbolic logic, etc.–are best suited for handwritten notes.

Being familiar with the material will better enable you to understand the professor’s lecture and separate out the important points.

Your goal isn’t to transcribe your professor’s lecture word for word, rather it’s to extract and record the main points of it.

Write the professor’s summary at the end of class and his review at the beginning of the next class.At the end of the class, your professor will often summarize the main takeaway points.

At the beginning of the next class, your professor may give a quick review of the previous class and then provide a preview of how those points are related to the day’s lecture.

If you didn’t get a point, make a note of it, and wait until after class to ask.If you missed a point, make a note to remind yourself to ask the professor about it after class.

I don’t know how many times I wrote a note in class that later left me scratching my head and wondering, “What the heck did I mean by that?”

If you don’t understand a note, clarify it by reviewing the reading material or by asking a fellow classmate or the professor.Reviewing your notes after class also aides in memory retention.

It requires you to look at different bits of information, figure out the main ideas and how they relate, and organize them in a way that makes sense.

Over the years, professors and learning experts have suggested various note-taking styles to help students organize their notes.

Rough Outline Method My typical note-taking style is to simply create a rough outline of the lecture using bullet points.

Advocates of mind mapping argue that the non-linear, visual format of mind maps allow students to find connections they’d otherwise miss when using traditional note-taking strategies.

Also, because mind mapping is a somewhat creative activity, by engaging both the left and right spheres of your brain, learning retention is supposed to improve (a claim that some brain researchers dispute).

To mind map a lecture, you simply write the main topic of the day’s lecture at the center of a piece of paper.

I tried it a few times during my academic career, but never found it very helpful for recording lecture notes.

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Wiki: Lesson 1

am doing simple human race image classifier, I have created a folder called ~/data/people_original and have three folders in there called caucasian, african and asian and populated each folder using the command google-images-download download 'african man' 'african woman' --keywords '' --download-limit 100 from within each folder.

was wondering if anyone has any munging code that could be repurposed for moving these splitting these images into the required folder structure that is present in the dogscats folder i.e.

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