AI News, An artificial nerve system gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touch

An artificial nerve system gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touch

The work, reported May 31 in Science, is a step toward creating artificial skin for prosthetic limbs, to restore sensation to amputees and, perhaps, one day give robots some type of reflex capability.

Building blocks This milestone is part of Bao's quest to mimic how skin can stretch, repair itself and, most remarkably, act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also when to order the muscles to react reflexively to make prompt decisions.

The synaptic network recognizes the pattern of the sudden stretch and emits two signals simultaneously, one causing the knee muscles to contract reflexively and a second, less urgent signal to register the sensation in the brain.

But in the Science paper, the group describes how the electronic neuron delivered signals to the synaptic transistor, which was engineered in such a way that it learned to recognize and react to sensory inputs based on the intensity and frequency of low-power signals, just like a biological synapse.

The electronic neuron converted the sensor signal into digital signals and relayed them through the synaptic transistor, causing the leg to twitch more or less vigorously as the pressure on the touch sensor increased or decreased.

For instance, creating artificial skin coverings for prosthetic devices will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, the ability to embed them into flexible circuits and then a way to interface all of this to the brain.

An artificial nerve system developed at Stanford gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touch

Stanford and Seoul National University researchers have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that can activate the twitch reflex in a cockroach and identify letters in the Braille alphabet.

“This artificial sensory nerve system is a step toward making skin-like sensory neural networks for all sorts of applications.” This milestone is part of Bao’s quest to mimic how skin can stretch, repair itself and, most remarkably, act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also when to order the muscles to react reflexively to make prompt decisions.

“The synaptic transistor performs these functions in the artificial nerve circuit.” Lee used a knee reflex as an example of how more-advanced artificial nerve circuits might one day be part of an artificial skin that would give prosthetic devices or robots both senses and reflexes.

The synaptic network recognizes the pattern of the sudden stretch and emits two signals simultaneously, one causing the knee muscles to contract reflexively and a second, less urgent signal to register the sensation in the brain.

But in the Science paper, the group describes how the electronic neuron delivered signals to the synaptic transistor, which was engineered in such a way that it learned to recognize and react to sensory inputs based on the intensity and frequency of low-power signals, just like a biological synapse.

For instance, creating artificial skin coverings for prosthetic devices will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, the ability to embed them into flexible circuits and then a way to interface all of this to the brain.

Artificial Nervous Systems Brings Real-Life Touch to Robots

According to Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering and one of the senior authors on the project, “We take skin for granted, but it’s a complex sensing, signaling, and decision-making system.

This artificial sensory nervous system is a step toward making skin-like sensory neural networks for all sorts of applications.” The new research paper published in Science describes how the team constructed artificial sensory nerve circuitry that could be embedded in the skin-like covering for neuroprosthetic devices and soft robotics.

The milestone of the research has been achieving the ability to mimic how skin can stretch, repair, and act like a smart sensory network that can transmit sensations to the brain and order the muscles reflex for decision-making movements.

Lee uses a knee reflex example of how the future advancements of artificial nerve circuits can eventually be used as an artificial skin for prosthetics devices and robots.

In a human knee, a sudden tap causes the knee muscles to stretch and activate particular muscle sensors that send impulses through a neuron.

The team tested the ability of the sensory system by hooking up its artificial nerve to a cockroach leg and applying tiny increments of pressure to the touch sensor.

However, the artificial skin covering prosthetic devices will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, along with the ability to embed them into flexible circuits and a viable brain interface.

Stanford researchers create artificial nerve system for robots

SAN FRANCISCO, May 31 (Xinhua) -- Researchers from Stanford University and Seoul National University have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that can potentially enable robots and prosthetic devices to have a sense of touch, Stanford said in a statement Thursday.

The artificial nerve circuit consists of three integrated components -- a touch sensor that can detect minuscule forces, a flexible electronic neuron that receives signals from the touch sensor, and the artificial synaptic transistor modeled from human synapses.

The latest milestone in the work of Bao and her team is part of her long-standing pursuit to imitate how skin can stretch, repair itself and act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also react reflexively to make prompt decisions when the muscles receive signal order.

Stanford researchers create artificial nerve system for robots

SAN FRANCISCO -- Researchers from Stanford University and Seoul National University have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that can potentially enable robots and prosthetic devices to have a sense of touch, Stanford said in a statement May 31.

The artificial nerve circuit consists of three integrated components -- a touch sensor that can detect minuscule forces, a flexible electronic neuron that receives signals from the touch sensor, and the artificial synaptic transistor modeled from human synapses.

The latest milestone in the work of Bao and her team is part of her long-standing pursuit to imitate how skin can stretch, repair itself and act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also react reflexively to make prompt decisions when the muscles receive signal order.

Kurzweilaccelerating intelligence

Researchers at Stanford University and Seoul National University have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that’s a step toward artificial skin for prosthetic limbs, restoring sensation to amputees, and giving robots human-like reflexes.* Their rudimentary artificial nerve circuit integrates three previously developed components: a touch-pressure sensor, a flexible electronic neuron, and an artificial synaptic transistor modeled on human synapses.

Lower-limb prostheses can take advantage of the same technology, which can also provide feedback about the distribution of the forces at the foot while walking.” Next research steps The researchers plan next to create artificial skin coverings for prosthetic devices, which will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, the ability to embed them into flexible circuits, and then a way to interface all of this to the brain.

“This artificial sensory nerve system is a step toward making skin-like sensory neural networks for all sorts of applications.” This milestone is part of Bao’s quest to mimic how skin can stretch, repair itself, and, most remarkably, act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also when to order the muscles to react reflexively to make prompt decisions.

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