AI News, An artificial nerve system developed at Stanford gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touch

An artificial nerve system developed at Stanford gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touch

Stanford and Seoul National University researchers have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that can activate the twitch reflex in a cockroach and identify letters in the Braille alphabet.

“This artificial sensory nerve system is a step toward making skin-like sensory neural networks for all sorts of applications.” This milestone is part of Bao’s quest to mimic how skin can stretch, repair itself and, most remarkably, act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also when to order the muscles to react reflexively to make prompt decisions.

“The synaptic transistor performs these functions in the artificial nerve circuit.” Lee used a knee reflex as an example of how more-advanced artificial nerve circuits might one day be part of an artificial skin that would give prosthetic devices or robots both senses and reflexes.

The synaptic network recognizes the pattern of the sudden stretch and emits two signals simultaneously, one causing the knee muscles to contract reflexively and a second, less urgent signal to register the sensation in the brain.

But in the Science paper, the group describes how the electronic neuron delivered signals to the synaptic transistor, which was engineered in such a way that it learned to recognize and react to sensory inputs based on the intensity and frequency of low-power signals, just like a biological synapse.

For instance, creating artificial skin coverings for prosthetic devices will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, the ability to embed them into flexible circuits and then a way to interface all of this to the brain.

Artificial skin technology mimics touch sensations and reflexes

By Amy Jeter Hansen It’s fair to say that we take our skin for granted, but as Zhenan Bao, PhD, points out, it’s actually “a complex sensing, signaling and decision-making system.” Bao, a Stanford chemical engineer, has been working for decades to develop an artificial skin that can mimic the organ’s ability to stretch, repair itself and function as a sensory network.

The release describes what happened next: The electronic neuron converted the sensor signal into digital signals and relayed them through the synaptic transistor, causing the leg to twitch more or less vigorously as the pressure on the touch sensor increased or decreased.

For instance, creating artificial skin coverings for prosthetic devices will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, the ability to embed them into flexible circuits and then a way to interface all of this to the brain.

Stanford researchers create artificial nerve system for robots

SAN FRANCISCO, May 31 (Xinhua) -- Researchers from Stanford University and Seoul National University have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that can potentially enable robots and prosthetic devices to have a sense of touch, Stanford said in a statement Thursday.

The artificial nerve circuit consists of three integrated components -- a touch sensor that can detect minuscule forces, a flexible electronic neuron that receives signals from the touch sensor, and the artificial synaptic transistor modeled from human synapses.

The latest milestone in the work of Bao and her team is part of her long-standing pursuit to imitate how skin can stretch, repair itself and act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also react reflexively to make prompt decisions when the muscles receive signal order.

Artificial Nerve System Gives Prostheses Sense of Touch

Researchers at Stanford University and Seoul National University, Korea, have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that can activate the twitch reflex in a cockroach as well as identify letters in the Braille alphabet.

The work, published May 31 in Science, is a step toward creating artificial skin and restoring sensation to people who use prosthetic limbs, said Zhenan Bao, PhD, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford and one of the senior authors.

For instance, creating artificial skin coverings for prosthetic devices will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, the ability to embed them into flexible circuits, and then a way to interface them to the brain.

Though it will be some time before the work reaches that level of complexity, in the Science paper, the group describes how the electronic neuron delivered signals to the synaptic transistor, which was engineered in such a way that it learned to recognize and react to sensory inputs based on the intensity and frequency of low-power signals, just like a biological synapse.

Kurzweilaccelerating intelligence

Researchers at Stanford University and Seoul National University have developed an artificial sensory nerve system that’s a step toward artificial skin for prosthetic limbs, restoring sensation to amputees, and giving robots human-like reflexes.* Their rudimentary artificial nerve circuit integrates three previously developed components: a touch-pressure sensor, a flexible electronic neuron, and an artificial synaptic transistor modeled on human synapses.

Lower-limb prostheses can take advantage of the same technology, which can also provide feedback about the distribution of the forces at the foot while walking.” Next research steps The researchers plan next to create artificial skin coverings for prosthetic devices, which will require new devices to detect heat and other sensations, the ability to embed them into flexible circuits, and then a way to interface all of this to the brain.

“This artificial sensory nerve system is a step toward making skin-like sensory neural networks for all sorts of applications.” This milestone is part of Bao’s quest to mimic how skin can stretch, repair itself, and, most remarkably, act like a smart sensory network that knows not only how to transmit pleasant sensations to the brain, but also when to order the muscles to react reflexively to make prompt decisions.

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