AI News, AI In Healthcare: 32 Examples Of Its Growing Impact

Emerging technologies

Emerging technologies are technologies whose development, practical applications, or both are still largely unrealized, such that they are figuratively emerging into prominence from a background of nonexistence or obscurity.

In other words, an emerging technology can be defined as 'a radically novel and relatively fast growing technology characterised by a certain degree of coherence persisting over time and with the potential to exert a considerable impact on the socio-economic domain(s) which is observed in terms of the composition of actors, institutions and patterns of interactions among those, along with the associated knowledge production processes.

Convergence brings previously separate technologies such as voice (and telephony features), data (and productivity applications) and video together so that they share resources and interact with each other, creating new efficiencies.

Cyberphilosophers Alexander Bard and Jan Söderqvist argue in The Futurica Trilogy that while Man himself is basically constant throughout human history (genes change very slowly), all relevant change is rather a direct or indirect result of technological innovation (memes change very fast) since new ideas always emanate from technology use and not the other way around.[8]

Some thinkers, including environmental ethicist Bill McKibben, oppose the continuing development of advanced technology partly out of fear that its benefits will be distributed unequally in ways that could worsen the plight of the poor.[11]

argue that as information technology advances, robots and other forms of automation will ultimately result in significant unemployment as machines and software begin to match and exceed the capability of workers to perform most routine jobs.

This may result in substantial unemployment at all skill levels, stagnant or falling wages for most workers, and increased concentration of income and wealth as the owners of capital capture an ever-larger fraction of the economy.

This in turn could lead to depressed consumer spending and economic growth as the bulk of the population lacks sufficient discretionary income to purchase the products and services produced by the economy.[15]

Major AI researchers and textbooks define the field as 'the study and design of intelligent agents,' where an intelligent agent is a system that perceives its environment and takes actions that maximize its chances of success.

The central functions (or goals) of AI research include reasoning, knowledge, planning, learning, natural language processing (communication), perception and the ability to move and manipulate objects.

Combined with Internet technology, 3D printing would allow for digital blueprints of virtually any material product to be sent instantly to another person to be produced on the spot, making purchasing a product online almost instantaneous.

Gene therapy was first successfully demonstrated in late 1990/early 1991 for adenosine deaminase deficiency, though the treatment was somatic – that is, did not affect the patient's germ line and thus was not heritable.

This led the way to treatments for other genetic diseases and increased interest in germ line gene therapy – therapy affecting the gametes and descendants of patients.

In vitro meat, also called cultured meat, clean meat, cruelty-free meat, shmeat, and test-tube meat, is an animal-flesh product that has never been part of a living animal with exception of the fetal calf serum taken from a slaughtered cow.

Some argue that it is less objectionable than traditionally obtained meat because it doesn't involve killing and reduces the risk of animal cruelty, while others disagree with eating meat that has not developed naturally.[citation needed]

This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter that occur below the given size threshold.

These technologies deal with automated machines that can take the place of humans in dangerous environments or manufacturing processes, or resemble humans in appearance, behavior, and/or cognition.

Hospitals will improve public health by being able to share valuable information about an illness, make the workflow more smooth by doctors being able to pull up records on a patient with ease, and even lower healthcare costs by not using as much paper (Banova[37]).

As innovation drives economic growth, and large economic rewards come from new inventions, a great deal of resources (funding and effort) go into the development of emerging technologies.

Science policy is the area of public policy which is concerned with the policies that affect the conduct of the science and research enterprise, including the funding of science, often in pursuance of other national policy goals such as technological innovation to promote commercial product development, weapons development, health care and environmental monitoring.

Note that while some of these awards reward achievement after-the-fact via analysis of the merits of technological breakthroughs, others provide incentive via competitions for awards offered for goals yet to be achieved.

Surgical robots, new medicines and better care: 32 examples of AI in healthcare

Artificial intelligence simplifies the lives of patients, doctors and hospital administrators by performing tasks that are typically done by humans, but in less time and at a fraction of the cost.   One of the world's highest-growth industries, the AI sector was valued at about $600 million in 2014 and is projected to reach a $150 billion by 2026.

Whether it's used to find new links between genetic codes or to drive surgery-assisting robots, artificial intelligence is reinventing — and reinvigorating — modern healthcare through machines that can predict, comprehend, learn and act.

The company’s deep learning platform analyzes unstructured medical data (radiology images, blood tests, EKGs, genomics, patient medical history) to give doctors better insight into a patient’s real-time needs.

The scientists used 25,000 images of blood samples to teach the machines how to search for bacteria. The machines then learned how to identify and predict harmful bacteria in blood with 95% accuracy.

Adam scoured billions of data points in public databases to hypothesize about the functions of 19 genes within yeast, predicting 9 new and accurate hypotheses.

BERG recently presented its findings on Parkinson’s Disease treatment —  they used AI to find links between chemicals in the human body that were previously unknown — at the Neuroscience 2018 conference.

Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts How it's using AI in healthcare: Combining AI, the cloud and quantum physics, XtalPi’s ID4 platform predicts the chemical and pharmaceutical properties of small-molecule candidates for drug design and development.

Additionally, the company claims its crystal structure prediction technology (aka polymorph prediction) predicts complex molecular systems within days rather than weeks or months.

Atomwise’s AI technology screens between 10 and 20 million genetic compounds each day and can reportedly deliver results 100 times faster than traditional pharmaceutical companies.

Location: London, England How it's using AI in healthcare: The primary goal of BenevolentAI is to get the right treatment to the right patients at the right time by using artificial intelligence to produce a better target selection and provide previously undiscovered insights through deep learning.

A 2016 study of 35,000 physician reviews revealed 96% of patient complaints are about lack of customer service, confusion over paperwork and negative front desk experiences.

New innovations in AI healthcare technology are streamlining the patient experience, helping hospital staff process millions, if not billions of data points, faster and more efficiently.

The company’s technology helps hospitals and clinics manage patient data, clinical history and payment information by using predictive analytics to intervene at critical junctures in the patient care experience.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio How it's using AI in healthcare: The Cleveland Clinic teamed up with IBM to infuse its IT capabilities with artificial intelligence.  The world-renowned hospital is using AI to gather information on trillions of administrative and health record data points to streamline the patient experience.

Since implementing the program, the facility has seen a 60% improvement in its ability to admit patients and a 21% increase in patient discharges before noon, resulting in a faster, more positive patient experience.

Additionally, the inability to connect important data points is slows the development of new drugs, preventative medicine and proper diagnosis.  Many in healthcare are turning to artificial intelligence as way to stop the data hemorrhaging.

Location: Seattle, Washington How it's using AI in healthcare: KenSci combines big data and artificial intelligence to predict clinical, financial and operational risk by taking data from existing sources to foretell everything from who might get sick to what's driving up a hospital’s healthcare costs.

The company’s software helps pathology labs eliminate bottlenecks in data management and uses AI-powered image analysis to connect data points that support cancer discovery and treatment.

How it's using AI in healthcare: When IBM’s Watson isn’t competing on Jeopardy!, it's helping healthcare professionals harness their data to optimize hospital efficiency, better engage with patients and improve treatment.

Location: Shenzhen, China How it's using AI in healthcare: ICarbonX is using AI and big data to look more closely at human life characteristics in a way they describe as “digital life.'  By analyzing the health and actions of human beings in a “carbon cloud,' the company hopes its big data will become so powerful that it can manage all aspects of health.

Robots equipped with cameras, mechanical arms and surgical instruments augment the experience, skill and knowledge of doctors to create a new kind of surgery. Surgeons control the mechanical arms while seated at a computer console while the robot gives the doctor a three dimensional, magnified view of the surgical site that surgeons could not get from relying on their eyes alone.

Being the first robotic surgery assistant approved by the FDA over 18 years ago, the surgical machines feature cameras, robotic arms and surgical tools to aide in minimally invasive procedures.

Under a physician’s control, the tiny robot enters the chest through a small incision, navigates to certain locations of the heart by itself, adheres to the surface of the heart and administers therapy.

Location: Eindhoven, The Netherlands How it's using AI in healthcare: MicroSure’s robots help surgeons overcome their human physical limitations.  The company's motion stabilizer system reportedly improves performance and precision during surgical procedures.

Location: Caesarea, Israel How it's using AI in healthcare: Surgeons use the Mazor Robotics' 3D tools to visualize their surgical plans, read images with AI that recognizes anatomical features and perform a more stable and precise spinal operation.

32 artificial intelligence companies building a smarter tomorrow

From Google and Amazon to Apple and Microsoft, every major tech company is dedicating resources to breakthroughs in artificial intelligence.

Meanwhile, revolutionary breakthroughs like self-driving cars may not be the norm, but are certainly within reach.  As the big guys scramble to infuse their products with artificial intelligence, other companies are hard at work developing their own intelligent technology and services.

By highlighting only the most relevant and interesting information, businesses can make quicker decisions regardless of the staff's experience with data or analytics.

RELATED ARTICLES20 examples of artificial intelligence shaking up business as usual How AI is changing the banking and finance industries The robots will see you now: How artificial intelligence is revolutionizing healthcare  

Industry: Fintech Location: New York, New York What it does: AlphaSense is an AI-powered search engine designed to help investment firms, banks and Fortune 500 companies find important information within transcripts, filings, news and research. The technology uses artificial intelligence to expand keyword searches for relevant content.

Using non-invasive blood tests, the company’s AI technology recognizes disease-associated patterns, providing earlier cancer detection and better treatment options.

Its LiDAR technology focuses on the most important information in a vehicle’s sightline such as people, other cars and animals, while putting less emphasis on things like the sky, buildings and surrounding vegetation.

By fusing problem solving, learning and memory technologies together, the company can build systems that learn and adapt without human assistance.

Called CARA A.I., the company's tech can search within the language, jurisdiction and citations of a user's uploaded documents and return relevant searches from the database.

Industry: Cloud, Robotics Location: Santa Clara, California What it does: CloudMinds provides cloud robot services for the finance, healthcare, manufacturing, power utilities, public sector and enterprise mobility industries.

Its cloud-based AI uses advanced algorithms, large-scale neural networks and training data to make smarter robots for image and object recognition, natural language processing, speech recognition and more.

The company's 'human-in-the-loop' platform uses human intelligence to train and test machine learning, and has powered AI projects for major companies like Oracle, Ebay SAP and Adobe.

From financial and insurance needs to travel and healthcare, the intelligent products perform duties and answer questions for tech support, billing, scheduling, purchases and policy information.

Industry: Big Data, Software Location: Mountain View, California What it does: Orbital Insight uses geospatial imagery and artificial intelligence to answer questions and gain insights invisible to the naked eye. Using data from satellites, drones, balloons and other aircrafts, the company can provide insights and forecasts to the agriculture and energy industries that normally wouldn’t be available.

Industry: Software Location: San Francisco, California What it does: OpenAI is a nonprofit research company with a mission to create safe artificial general intelligence (AGI). AGI aims to create machines with general purpose intelligence similar to human beings. With a focus on long-term research and transparency, OpenAI hopes to advance AGI safely and responsibly.

Sift uses thousands of data points from around the web to train in detecting fraud patterns. The technology helps payment processors, marketplaces, e-commerce stores and even social networks prevent fraud.

Industry: Software, Healthtech Location: Berkeley, California (US office) What it does: Zebra Medical Vision develops technology for radiology and medical imaging, enhancing the diagnostic abilities of radiologists while maximizing focus on patient care.

These algorithms will ultimately help medical professionals detect high-risk patients earlier and manage growing workloads with more accurate outcomes.

Spanning the agriculture, pharmaceutical and chemical industry, the company enables faster cultivation of microbes through automation software and a huge catalog of physical and digital DNA data.