AI News, 2017 was the year the robots really, truly arrived

2017 was the year the robots really, truly arrived

To build a robot you don’t have to babysit, you need it to sense its environment, and to sense its environment it needs a range of sensors.

“I kind of talk about this finally being the golden age of robotics, and that means that for the first time in the last 12 months or so you see robots really becoming prolific,” says Ben Wolff, CEO of Sarcos Robotics, which makes the most bonkers robot arms you’ve ever seen.

“And I think it’s because we’re finally at that crossover point, where the cost has come down of components while the capability of the components has increased sufficiently.” Like, come down big time.

2017 Was the Year the Robots Really, Truly Arrived

"It's only recently that both computers have become smart enough and that robot hardware has become reliable enough that the very first products start to emerge.” Perhaps the biggest leap in hardware has been sensor technology.

“I kind of talk about this finally being the golden age of robotics, and that means that for the first time in the last 12 months or so you see robots really becoming prolific,” says Ben Wolff, CEO of Sarcos Robotics, which makes the most bonkers robot arms you’ve ever seen.

“And I think it's because we're finally at that crossover point, where the cost has come down of components while the capability of the components has increased sufficiently.” Like, come down big time.

It ain’t perfect, which is why a human handler follows the robot to remote-control it when it gets in trouble (when WIRED got a demo in April, it nearly ran down a dog).

Luckily, better chips mean all of these calculations can now happen aboard the machine, as opposed to giant computers doing the processing in the cloud.

Our human brains tend to anthropomorphize anything that remotely seems like an intelligent agent, so it's tempting to form bonds with the machines, especially when they’re “cute” and “lovable.” I mean, back in August it happened to me: I told a robot I loved it just to get its attention.

At some point, the manufacturer might exploit that relationship by having the doll ask the kid if they want an over-the-air update that’d make the robot even more fun—for the low, low price of $49.99.

But as someone who’s experienced the surprising psychological draw of robots, I want to make this clear: The robot-human relationship is bizarre and fraught with potential misadventures.

Hillcrest Labs Launches High Precision Sensor Hub to Advance Navigation Systems in Cost Critical Consumer Robots

(NASDAQ:IDCC), today announced the launch of the FSP200, a high-performance and low-power sensor hub MCU that delivers superior planar heading and 6-axis IMU performance for high volume, cost conscious, consumer robotics applications.

When paired with an external 6-axis inertial sensor (accelerometer plus gyroscope), the FSP200 delivers the performance and features required for today’s robots, including: The FSP200 fits simply into any design and uses common industry interfaces for chip connectivity.

It can be placed directly on the robot’s main circuit board or designed into a separate module, providing manufacturers with ultimate flexibility.  The turn-key component benefits developers and integrators through faster time-to-market, reductions in development time, reduced BOM cost, and the highest precision and quality.

“The FSP200 serves a key part of our product family, underscoring our mission to advance the consumer robotics market by continually delivering superior solutions to the market.” The FSP200 is available for immediate sampling along with documentation and evaluation tools, and Hillcrest Labs will begin taking production orders in first quarter 2018.

Our proprietary and patented Freespace® technology transforms human and machine movement into high quality, application-ready information which enables developers and manufacturers to create everyday products that work with precision.

Humanoid robot

A humanoid robot is a robot with its body shape built to resemble the human body.

The design may be for functional purposes, such as interacting with human tools and environments, for experimental purposes, such as the study of al locomotion, or for other purposes.

In general, humanoid robots have a torso, a head, two arms, and two legs, though some forms of humanoid robots may model only part of the body, for example, from the waist up.

Human cognition is a field of study which is focused on how humans learn from sensory information in order to acquire perceptual and motor skills.

Although the initial aim of humanoid research was to build better orthosis and prosthesis for human beings, knowledge has been transferred between both disciplines.

A few examples are powered leg prosthesis for neuromuscularly impaired, ankle-foot orthosis, biological realistic leg prosthesis and forearm prosthesis.

Besides the research, humanoid robots are being developed to perform human tasks like personal assistance, through which they should be able to assist the sick and elderly, and dirty or dangerous jobs.

In essence, since they can use tools and operate equipment and vehicles designed for the human form, humanoids could theoretically perform any task a human being can, so long as they have the proper software.

Humanoid robots, especially those with artificial intelligence algorithms, could be useful for future dangerous and/or distant space exploration missions, without having the need to turn back around again and return to Earth once the mission is completed.

The Shadow Hand uses an array of 34 tactels arranged beneath its polyurethane skin on each finger tip.[3] Tactile sensors also provide information about forces and torques transferred between the robot and other objects.

While electric coreless motor actuators are better suited for high speed and low load applications, hydraulic ones operate well at low speed and high load applications.

In planning and control, the essential difference between humanoids and other kinds of robots (like industrial ones) is that the movement of the robot has to be human-like, using legged locomotion, especially biped gait.

Maintenance of the robot’s gravity center over the center of bearing area for providing a stable position can be chosen as a goal of control.[4] To maintain dynamic balance during the walk, a robot needs information about contact force and its current and desired motion.

To allow humanoids to move in complex environments, planning and control must focus on self-collision detection, path planning and obstacle avoidance.

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3D Printing of a sensor on the nano scale in a scanning electron microscope (SEM)

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Arduino Tutorial - Make a Flex Sensor for Robotic Hand (Cheap and Simple)

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8. Components and Classification of Sensors

basic electronics course of thermistor analog & digital

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How to make a Robot Toy using proximity sensor and old CD - DIY Robot

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Moral Math of Robots: Can Life and Death Decisions Be Coded?

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